Wildlife use of Douglas-fir dwarf mistletoe witches' brooms in the southwest

Shaula J. Hedwall, Robert L Mathiasen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated wildlife use of witches' brooms associated with infection by Douglas-fir dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium douglasii) in 6 mixed-conifer study areas in Arizona and 2 areas in New Mexico. We climbed 153 infected Douglas-firs (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and examined 706 witches' brooms for evidence of wildlife use. Even though we observed evidence of use by birds, most wildlife use was by small mammals, particularly red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Red squirrels used witches' brooms for nesting, foraging, caching, and as latrines. Witches' brooms classified as Type II or III brooms, located close to the main bole with large platforms, and 5-10 m above the ground were the most frequently used by red squirrels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-455
Number of pages6
JournalWestern North American Naturalist
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Fingerprint

Santalales
squirrels
Pseudotsuga menziesii
wildlife
Arceuthobium douglasii
Tamiasciurus hudsonicus
caching
small mammal
small mammals
conifers
tree trunk
coniferous tree
foraging
bird
birds
infection

Keywords

  • Arceuthobium douglasii
  • Douglas-fir
  • Douglas-fir dwarf mistletoe
  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Red squirrel
  • Southwest
  • Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Wildlife use of Douglas-fir dwarf mistletoe witches' brooms in the southwest. / Hedwall, Shaula J.; Mathiasen, Robert L.

In: Western North American Naturalist, Vol. 66, No. 4, 10.2006, p. 450-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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