White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France

Michael G. Campana, Naoko P. Kurata, Jeffrey T Foster, Lauren E. Helgen, Dee Ann M. Reeder, Robert C. Fleischer, Kristofer M. Helgen

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

White-nose syndrome, first diagnosed in North America in 2006, causes mass deaths among bats in North America. We found the causative fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in a 1918 sample collected in Europe, where bats have now adapted to the fungus. These results are consistent with a Eurasian origin of the pathogen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1611-1612
Number of pages2
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

North America
Nose
France
Fungi
Cause of Death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Campana, M. G., Kurata, N. P., Foster, J. T., Helgen, L. E., Reeder, D. A. M., Fleischer, R. C., & Helgen, K. M. (2017). White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(9), 1611-1612. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2309.170875

White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France. / Campana, Michael G.; Kurata, Naoko P.; Foster, Jeffrey T; Helgen, Lauren E.; Reeder, Dee Ann M.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Helgen, Kristofer M.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 23, No. 9, 01.09.2017, p. 1611-1612.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Campana, MG, Kurata, NP, Foster, JT, Helgen, LE, Reeder, DAM, Fleischer, RC & Helgen, KM 2017, 'White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 23, no. 9, pp. 1611-1612. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2309.170875
Campana MG, Kurata NP, Foster JT, Helgen LE, Reeder DAM, Fleischer RC et al. White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017 Sep 1;23(9):1611-1612. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2309.170875
Campana, Michael G. ; Kurata, Naoko P. ; Foster, Jeffrey T ; Helgen, Lauren E. ; Reeder, Dee Ann M. ; Fleischer, Robert C. ; Helgen, Kristofer M. / White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 1611-1612.
@article{81f4e75243e0470389446de858ffec1f,
title = "White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France",
abstract = "White-nose syndrome, first diagnosed in North America in 2006, causes mass deaths among bats in North America. We found the causative fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in a 1918 sample collected in Europe, where bats have now adapted to the fungus. These results are consistent with a Eurasian origin of the pathogen.",
author = "Campana, {Michael G.} and Kurata, {Naoko P.} and Foster, {Jeffrey T} and Helgen, {Lauren E.} and Reeder, {Dee Ann M.} and Fleischer, {Robert C.} and Helgen, {Kristofer M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3201/eid2309.170875",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "1611--1612",
journal = "Emerging Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1080-6040",
publisher = "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - White-nose syndrome fungus in a 1918 bat specimen from France

AU - Campana, Michael G.

AU - Kurata, Naoko P.

AU - Foster, Jeffrey T

AU - Helgen, Lauren E.

AU - Reeder, Dee Ann M.

AU - Fleischer, Robert C.

AU - Helgen, Kristofer M.

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - White-nose syndrome, first diagnosed in North America in 2006, causes mass deaths among bats in North America. We found the causative fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in a 1918 sample collected in Europe, where bats have now adapted to the fungus. These results are consistent with a Eurasian origin of the pathogen.

AB - White-nose syndrome, first diagnosed in North America in 2006, causes mass deaths among bats in North America. We found the causative fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in a 1918 sample collected in Europe, where bats have now adapted to the fungus. These results are consistent with a Eurasian origin of the pathogen.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030327049&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030327049&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3201/eid2309.170875

DO - 10.3201/eid2309.170875

M3 - Letter

VL - 23

SP - 1611

EP - 1612

JO - Emerging Infectious Diseases

JF - Emerging Infectious Diseases

SN - 1080-6040

IS - 9

ER -