When things are sensors for cloud AI

Protecting privacy through data collection transparency in the age of digital assistants

Paul G Flikkema, Bertrand Cambou

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The rapidly increasing number of intelligent, cloud-connected things that are embedded in our daily lives raises legitimate concerns about the privacy costs paid for the benefits these technologies provide. In this paper, we argue that this is a false choice, and motivate and describe a technology that enables citizens to effectively and conveniently monitor data collected about them. Our overarching goal is to expand awareness of the need to move from the current state of consumer ignorance or apprehensive trust to an era of data collection transparency (DCT), where consumers understand the data that is collected about them and make informed decisions based on that understanding. We show that DCT can be achieved with a suite of technologies built around recent developments in secure elements, as well as a virtual token methodology with public keys using addressable cryptographic tables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGIoTS 2017 - Global Internet of Things Summit, Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781509058730
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2017
Event2017 Global Internet of Things Summit, GIoTS 2017 - Geneva, Switzerland
Duration: Jun 6 2017Jun 9 2017

Other

Other2017 Global Internet of Things Summit, GIoTS 2017
CountrySwitzerland
CityGeneva
Period6/6/176/9/17

Fingerprint

Transparency
Sensors
Data collection
Sensor
Privacy
Costs
Methodology
Ignorance

Keywords

  • data collection transparency
  • personal assistant
  • privacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems and Management

Cite this

Flikkema, P. G., & Cambou, B. (2017). When things are sensors for cloud AI: Protecting privacy through data collection transparency in the age of digital assistants. In GIoTS 2017 - Global Internet of Things Summit, Proceedings [8016284] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/GIOTS.2017.8016284

When things are sensors for cloud AI : Protecting privacy through data collection transparency in the age of digital assistants. / Flikkema, Paul G; Cambou, Bertrand.

GIoTS 2017 - Global Internet of Things Summit, Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. 8016284.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Flikkema, PG & Cambou, B 2017, When things are sensors for cloud AI: Protecting privacy through data collection transparency in the age of digital assistants. in GIoTS 2017 - Global Internet of Things Summit, Proceedings., 8016284, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017 Global Internet of Things Summit, GIoTS 2017, Geneva, Switzerland, 6/6/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/GIOTS.2017.8016284
Flikkema PG, Cambou B. When things are sensors for cloud AI: Protecting privacy through data collection transparency in the age of digital assistants. In GIoTS 2017 - Global Internet of Things Summit, Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2017. 8016284 https://doi.org/10.1109/GIOTS.2017.8016284
Flikkema, Paul G ; Cambou, Bertrand. / When things are sensors for cloud AI : Protecting privacy through data collection transparency in the age of digital assistants. GIoTS 2017 - Global Internet of Things Summit, Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017.
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