We are all connected

rock art ontologies in the Southwestern U.S

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Members of Indigenous communities in Arizona and New Mexico explain that petroglyphs and rock paintings serve as animate, tangible, and enduring connections among places, ancestors, and contemporary communities in ways that non-Native public lands managers can only understand with instruction in Native peoples’ ontologies. Rock art sometimes takes an active role in resistance to environmental injustice and cultural appropriation. Archaeologists should study rock art in this region as material evidence for changing and varied human-land relationships, and collaborate with Indigenous communities and public lands managers to develop sustainable and culturally sensitive management programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-107
Number of pages13
JournalTime and Mind
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2019

Fingerprint

ontology
art
manager
community
Mexico
instruction
management
evidence
Public Lands
Indigenous Communities
Ontology
Managers
Rock Art
Cultural Appropriation
Ancestors
Petroglyphs
Native People
Animate
Injustice
Rock Painting

Keywords

  • community collaboration
  • indigenous ontologies
  • Rock art site management
  • southwestern United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Anthropology
  • Archaeology

Cite this

We are all connected : rock art ontologies in the Southwestern U.S. / Hays-Gilpin, Kelley A.

In: Time and Mind, Vol. 12, No. 2, 03.04.2019, p. 95-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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