Warming reduces the growth and diversity of biological soil crusts in a semi-arid environment

Implications for ecosystem structure and functioning

Cristina Escolar, Isabel Martínez, Matthew A Bowker, Fernando T. Maestre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are key biotic components of dryland ecosystems worldwide that control many functional processes, including carbon and nitrogen cycling, soil stabilization and infiltration. Regardless of their ecological importance and prevalence in drylands, very few studies have explicitly evaluated how climate change will affect the structure and composition of BSCs, and the functioning of their constituents. Using a manipulative experiment conducted over 3 years in a semi-arid site from central Spain, we evaluated how the composition, structure and performance of lichen-dominated BSCs respond to a 2.4°C increase in temperature, and to an approximately 30 per cent reduction of total annual rainfall. In areas with well-developed BSCs, warming promoted a significant decrease in the richness and diversity of the whole BSC community. This was accompanied by important compositional changes, as the cover of lichens suffered a substantial decrease with warming (from 70 to 40% on average), while that of mosses increased slightly (from 0.3 to 7% on average). The physiological performance of the BSC community, evaluated using chlorophyll fluorescence, increased with warming during the first year of the experiment, but did not respond to rainfall reduction. Our results indicate that ongoing climate change will strongly affect the diversity and composition of BSC communities, as well as their recovery after disturbances. The expected changes in richness and composition under warming could reduce or even reverse the positive effects of BSCs on important soil processes. Thus, these changes are likely to promote an overall reduction in ecosystem processes that sustain and control nutrient cycling, soil stabilization and water dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3087-3099
Number of pages13
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume367
Issue number1606
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 19 2012

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soil crusts
soil crust
ecosystem structure
Biodiversity
dry environmental conditions
arid environment
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
Soil
warming
biodiversity
Soils
ecosystems
Growth
soil stabilization
arid lands
lichen
lichens
Lichens
Climate Change

Keywords

  • Biological soil crusts
  • Climate change
  • Lichens
  • Mediterranean
  • Mosses
  • Semi-arid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Warming reduces the growth and diversity of biological soil crusts in a semi-arid environment : Implications for ecosystem structure and functioning. / Escolar, Cristina; Martínez, Isabel; Bowker, Matthew A; Maestre, Fernando T.

In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 367, No. 1606, 19.11.2012, p. 3087-3099.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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