Vertical forces and plantar pressures in selected aerobic movements versus walking.

D. L. Thompson, M. R. Hatley, T. G. McPoil, Mark W Cornwall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten subjects between the ages of 19 and 29 years walked and performed four aerobic movements over a force and pressure platform. Peak plantar pressure and peak vertical force data were collected three times on the dominant leg as each subject performed all of the five activities. Peak vertical forces acting on the lower extremities for the low impact aerobic movements were significantly less when compared with the high impact movements. As was expected, no differences were found in peak vertical forces between walking and the low impact aerobic movements. Peak plantar pressures for walking were not significantly different when compared with any of the four aerobic movements studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-508
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Volume83
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1993

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Walking
Pressure
Lower Extremity
Leg

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Vertical forces and plantar pressures in selected aerobic movements versus walking. / Thompson, D. L.; Hatley, M. R.; McPoil, T. G.; Cornwall, Mark W.

In: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, Vol. 83, No. 9, 09.1993, p. 504-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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