US and international stock reaction to common information

Ding Du, Karen C. Denning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As an out of sample test of the behavioral models of Barberis, Shleifer, and Vishny (1998), Daniel, Hirshleifer, and Subrahmanyam (1998) and Hong and Stein (1999), we extend Kothari, Lewellen, and Warner (2006) and examine both US and international stock price reaction to common market-wide information. Using a regression approach, we examine two sets of US portfolios: size-sorted portfolios and book-to-market-ratio-sorted portfolios over the period 1941-2006 and international stock markets over the period 1975-2006. We find evidence of both under- and over-reaction but it is not systematic, nor is it as the behavioral models predict. We conclude that though investors may make mistakes, they do not do so consistently. Thus, we interpret our results are consistent with the efficient market hypothesis and with the more recent evolutionary model of Lo (2006).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-89
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Research Journal of Finance and Economics
Volume1
Issue number24
StatePublished - Feb 2009

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Behavioral model
Book-to-market ratio
Stock price reaction
International stock markets
Underreaction
Efficient market hypothesis
Overreaction
Evolutionary models
Investors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Finance

Cite this

US and international stock reaction to common information. / Du, Ding; Denning, Karen C.

In: International Research Journal of Finance and Economics, Vol. 1, No. 24, 02.2009, p. 77-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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