Untangling the biological contributions to soil stability in semiarid shrublands

V. Bala Chaudhary, Matthew A Bowker, Thomas E. O'Dell, James B. Grace, Andrea E. Redman, Matthias C. Rillig, Nancy Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Communities of plants, biological soil crusts (BSCs), and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are known to influence soil stability individually, but their relative contributions, interactions, and combined effects are not well understood, particularly in arid and semiarid ecosystems. In a landscape-scale field study we quantified plant, BSC, and AM fungal communities at 216 locations along a gradient of soil stability levels in southern Utah, USA. We used multivariate modeling to examine the relative influences of plants, BSCs, and AM fungi on surface and subsurface stability in a semiarid shrubland landscape. Models were found to be congruent with the data and explained 35% of the variation in surface stability and 54% of the variation in subsurface stability. The results support several tentative conclusions. While BSCs, plants, and AM fungi all contribute to surface stability, only plants and AM fungi contribute to subsurface stability. In both surface and subsurface models, the strongest contributions to soil stability are made by biological components of the system. Biological soil crust cover was found to have the strongest direct effect on surface soil stability (0.60; controlling for other factors). Surprisingly, AM fungi appeared to influence surface soil stability (0.37), even though they are not generally considered to exist in the top few millimeters of the soil. In the subsurface model, plant cover appeared to have the strongest direct influence on soil stability (0.42); in both models, results indicate that plant cover influences soil stability both directly (controlling for other factors) and indirectly through influences on other organisms. Soil organic matter was not found to have a direct contribution to surface or subsurface stability in this system. The relative influence of AM fungi on soil stability in these semiarid shrublands was similar to that reported for a mesic tallgrass prairie. Estimates of effects that BSCs, plants, and AM fungi have on soil stability in these models are used to suggest the relative amounts of resources that erosion control practitioners should devote to promoting these communities. This study highlights the need for system approaches in combating erosion, soil degradation, and arid-land desertification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-122
Number of pages13
JournalEcological Applications
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

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shrubland
soil crust
fungus
soil stability
soil degradation
erosion control
desertification
prairie
soil organic matter
erosion
ecosystem
resource

Keywords

  • Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
  • Arid ecosystems
  • Biological soil crusts
  • Erosion control
  • Soil stability
  • Structural equation modeling ( SEM)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Untangling the biological contributions to soil stability in semiarid shrublands. / Chaudhary, V. Bala; Bowker, Matthew A; O'Dell, Thomas E.; Grace, James B.; Redman, Andrea E.; Rillig, Matthias C.; Johnson, Nancy.

In: Ecological Applications, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 110-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaudhary, V. Bala ; Bowker, Matthew A ; O'Dell, Thomas E. ; Grace, James B. ; Redman, Andrea E. ; Rillig, Matthias C. ; Johnson, Nancy. / Untangling the biological contributions to soil stability in semiarid shrublands. In: Ecological Applications. 2009 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 110-122.
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