Tularemia in Alaska, 1938-2010

Cristina M. Hansen, Amy J. Vogler, Paul S Keim, David M Wagner, Karsten Hueffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tularemia is a serious, potentially life threatening zoonotic disease. The causative agent, Francisella tularensis, is ubiquitous in the Northern hemisphere, including Alaska, where it was first isolated from a rabbit tick (Haemophysalis leporis-palustris) in 1938. Since then, F. tularensis has been isolated from wildlife and humans throughout the state. Serologic surveys have found measurable antibodies with prevalence ranging from <1% to 50% and 4% to 18% for selected populations of wildlife species and humans, respectively. We reviewed and summarized known literature on tularemia surveillance in Alaska and summarized the epidemiological information on human cases reported to public health officials. Additionally, available F. tularensis isolates from Alaska were analyzed using canonical SNPs and a multi-locus variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) system. The results show that both F. t. tularensis and F. t. holarctica are present in Alaska and that subtype A.I, the most virulent type, is responsible for most recently reported human clinical cases in the state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61
Number of pages1
JournalActa Veterinaria Scandinavica
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 18 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

tularemia
Tularemia
Francisella tularensis
wildlife
Haemaphysalis leporispalustris
Minisatellite Repeats
minisatellite repeats
Zoonoses
Ticks
serological surveys
zoonoses
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
public health
Public Health
Rabbits
loci
antibodies
Antibodies
monitoring
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Tularemia in Alaska, 1938-2010. / Hansen, Cristina M.; Vogler, Amy J.; Keim, Paul S; Wagner, David M; Hueffer, Karsten.

In: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, 18.11.2011, p. 61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hansen, Cristina M. ; Vogler, Amy J. ; Keim, Paul S ; Wagner, David M ; Hueffer, Karsten. / Tularemia in Alaska, 1938-2010. In: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica. 2011 ; pp. 61.
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