Tick-borne relapsing fever outbreak among a high school football team at an outdoor education camping trip, Arizona, 2014

Jefferson M. Jones, Carter R. Hranac, Mare Schumacher, Kim Horn, Darlene M. Lee, Joel Terriquez, David M. Engelthaler, Marie Peoples, Jennifer Corrigan, Adam Replogle, Nina Souders, Kenneth K. Komatsu, Nathan C Nieto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During August 2014, five high school students who had attended an outdoor education camp were hospitalized with a febrile illness, prompting further investigation. Ten total cases of tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) were identified - six cases confirmed by culture or visualization of spirochetes on blood smear and four probable cases with compatible symptoms (attack rate: 23%). All patients had slept in the campsite's only cabin. Before the camp, a professional pest control company had rodent proofed the cabin, but no acaricides had been applied. Cabin inspection after the camp found rodents and Ornithodoros ticks, the vector of TBRF. Blood samples from a chipmunk trapped near the cabin and from patients contained Borrelia hermsii with identical gene sequences (100% over 630 base pairs). Health departments in TBRF endemic areas should consider educating cabin owners and pest control companies to apply acaricides during or following rodent proofing, because ticks that lack rodents for a blood meal might feed on humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)546-550
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume95
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Camping
Ornithodoros
Football
Disease Outbreaks
Rodentia
Acaricides
Education
Pest Control
Ticks
Borrelia
Sciuridae
Spirochaetales
Base Pairing
Meals
Fever
Students
Health
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Tick-borne relapsing fever outbreak among a high school football team at an outdoor education camping trip, Arizona, 2014. / Jones, Jefferson M.; Hranac, Carter R.; Schumacher, Mare; Horn, Kim; Lee, Darlene M.; Terriquez, Joel; Engelthaler, David M.; Peoples, Marie; Corrigan, Jennifer; Replogle, Adam; Souders, Nina; Komatsu, Kenneth K.; Nieto, Nathan C.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 95, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 546-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, JM, Hranac, CR, Schumacher, M, Horn, K, Lee, DM, Terriquez, J, Engelthaler, DM, Peoples, M, Corrigan, J, Replogle, A, Souders, N, Komatsu, KK & Nieto, NC 2016, 'Tick-borne relapsing fever outbreak among a high school football team at an outdoor education camping trip, Arizona, 2014', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 95, no. 3, pp. 546-550. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0054
Jones, Jefferson M. ; Hranac, Carter R. ; Schumacher, Mare ; Horn, Kim ; Lee, Darlene M. ; Terriquez, Joel ; Engelthaler, David M. ; Peoples, Marie ; Corrigan, Jennifer ; Replogle, Adam ; Souders, Nina ; Komatsu, Kenneth K. ; Nieto, Nathan C. / Tick-borne relapsing fever outbreak among a high school football team at an outdoor education camping trip, Arizona, 2014. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2016 ; Vol. 95, No. 3. pp. 546-550.
@article{1d56a23587d9438789276f4255e17162,
title = "Tick-borne relapsing fever outbreak among a high school football team at an outdoor education camping trip, Arizona, 2014",
abstract = "During August 2014, five high school students who had attended an outdoor education camp were hospitalized with a febrile illness, prompting further investigation. Ten total cases of tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) were identified - six cases confirmed by culture or visualization of spirochetes on blood smear and four probable cases with compatible symptoms (attack rate: 23{\%}). All patients had slept in the campsite's only cabin. Before the camp, a professional pest control company had rodent proofed the cabin, but no acaricides had been applied. Cabin inspection after the camp found rodents and Ornithodoros ticks, the vector of TBRF. Blood samples from a chipmunk trapped near the cabin and from patients contained Borrelia hermsii with identical gene sequences (100{\%} over 630 base pairs). Health departments in TBRF endemic areas should consider educating cabin owners and pest control companies to apply acaricides during or following rodent proofing, because ticks that lack rodents for a blood meal might feed on humans.",
author = "Jones, {Jefferson M.} and Hranac, {Carter R.} and Mare Schumacher and Kim Horn and Lee, {Darlene M.} and Joel Terriquez and Engelthaler, {David M.} and Marie Peoples and Jennifer Corrigan and Adam Replogle and Nina Souders and Komatsu, {Kenneth K.} and Nieto, {Nathan C}",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4269/ajtmh.16-0054",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "95",
pages = "546--550",
journal = "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
issn = "0002-9637",
publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tick-borne relapsing fever outbreak among a high school football team at an outdoor education camping trip, Arizona, 2014

AU - Jones, Jefferson M.

AU - Hranac, Carter R.

AU - Schumacher, Mare

AU - Horn, Kim

AU - Lee, Darlene M.

AU - Terriquez, Joel

AU - Engelthaler, David M.

AU - Peoples, Marie

AU - Corrigan, Jennifer

AU - Replogle, Adam

AU - Souders, Nina

AU - Komatsu, Kenneth K.

AU - Nieto, Nathan C

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - During August 2014, five high school students who had attended an outdoor education camp were hospitalized with a febrile illness, prompting further investigation. Ten total cases of tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) were identified - six cases confirmed by culture or visualization of spirochetes on blood smear and four probable cases with compatible symptoms (attack rate: 23%). All patients had slept in the campsite's only cabin. Before the camp, a professional pest control company had rodent proofed the cabin, but no acaricides had been applied. Cabin inspection after the camp found rodents and Ornithodoros ticks, the vector of TBRF. Blood samples from a chipmunk trapped near the cabin and from patients contained Borrelia hermsii with identical gene sequences (100% over 630 base pairs). Health departments in TBRF endemic areas should consider educating cabin owners and pest control companies to apply acaricides during or following rodent proofing, because ticks that lack rodents for a blood meal might feed on humans.

AB - During August 2014, five high school students who had attended an outdoor education camp were hospitalized with a febrile illness, prompting further investigation. Ten total cases of tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) were identified - six cases confirmed by culture or visualization of spirochetes on blood smear and four probable cases with compatible symptoms (attack rate: 23%). All patients had slept in the campsite's only cabin. Before the camp, a professional pest control company had rodent proofed the cabin, but no acaricides had been applied. Cabin inspection after the camp found rodents and Ornithodoros ticks, the vector of TBRF. Blood samples from a chipmunk trapped near the cabin and from patients contained Borrelia hermsii with identical gene sequences (100% over 630 base pairs). Health departments in TBRF endemic areas should consider educating cabin owners and pest control companies to apply acaricides during or following rodent proofing, because ticks that lack rodents for a blood meal might feed on humans.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84984804725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84984804725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0054

DO - 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0054

M3 - Article

VL - 95

SP - 546

EP - 550

JO - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0002-9637

IS - 3

ER -