The Navajo Nation, Diné Archaeologists, Diné Archaeology, and Diné Communities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are several major considerations for the Navajo Nation that foreground questions of inclusion in public archaeology. The traditional Diné view of archaeological remains requires an evaluation of the public archaeologist's notion of inclusion of Diné communities in archaeological research. Archaeological work on the Navajo Nation is also often a source of frustration for Diné communities because a shortage of human and monetary resources slows the pace of legislated archaeological compliance, in turn, slowing down vital housing and road infrastructural development. Finally, for Diné archaeologists, the structure of project development is not necessarily conducive to the creation of an intellectual foundation for Diné archaeology or community engagement in archaeological research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)502-517
Number of pages16
JournalArchaeologies
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Archaeology
Archaeologists
Inclusion
Archaeological Research
Resources
Community Engagement
Evaluation
Archaeological Remains
Frustration
Roads
Public Archaeology

Keywords

  • Archaeology
  • Community
  • Diné
  • Navajo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology

Cite this

The Navajo Nation, Diné Archaeologists, Diné Archaeology, and Diné Communities. / Thompson, Kerry F.

In: Archaeologies, Vol. 7, No. 3, 12.2011, p. 502-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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