The importance of construct breadth when examining interrole conflict

Ann H Huffman, Satoris S. Youngcourt, Stephanie C. Payne, Carl A. Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research examining the influence of nonwork issues on work-related outcomes has flourished. Often, however, the breadth of the interrole conflict construct varies widely between studies. To determine if the breadth of the interrole conflict measure makes a difference, the current study compares the criterion-related validity of scores yielded by a work-nonwork conflict scale and those yielded by a work-family conflict scale using active-duty U.S. Army soldiers stationed in Germany and Italy with spouses and/or children and without spouses or children. Results demonstrated that the two constructs are related but distinct. In addition, work-family conflict had a stronger relationship with job satisfaction and turnover intentions for employees with a spouse and/or children than for single, childless employees, whereas work-nonwork conflict had a stronger relationship with these outcomes for single, childless employees than for employees with a spouse and/or children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-530
Number of pages16
JournalEducational and Psychological Measurement
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

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Keywords

  • Job satisfaction
  • Turnover intentions
  • Work-family conflict
  • Work-nonwork conflict

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mathematics (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

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