The importance of construct breadth when examining interrole conflict

Ann H Huffman, Satoris S. Youngcourt, Stephanie C. Payne, Carl A. Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research examining the influence of nonwork issues on work-related outcomes has flourished. Often, however, the breadth of the interrole conflict construct varies widely between studies. To determine if the breadth of the interrole conflict measure makes a difference, the current study compares the criterion-related validity of scores yielded by a work-nonwork conflict scale and those yielded by a work-family conflict scale using active-duty U.S. Army soldiers stationed in Germany and Italy with spouses and/or children and without spouses or children. Results demonstrated that the two constructs are related but distinct. In addition, work-family conflict had a stronger relationship with job satisfaction and turnover intentions for employees with a spouse and/or children than for single, childless employees, whereas work-nonwork conflict had a stronger relationship with these outcomes for single, childless employees than for employees with a spouse and/or children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-530
Number of pages16
JournalEducational and Psychological Measurement
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Fingerprint

Breadth
Personnel
Spouses
spouse
employee
family work
Job satisfaction
Personnel Turnover
Job Satisfaction
Military Personnel
job satisfaction
turnover
soldier
Italy
Germany
military
Conflict
Conflict (Psychology)
Vary
Distinct

Keywords

  • Job satisfaction
  • Turnover intentions
  • Work-family conflict
  • Work-nonwork conflict

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mathematics (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The importance of construct breadth when examining interrole conflict. / Huffman, Ann H; Youngcourt, Satoris S.; Payne, Stephanie C.; Castro, Carl A.

In: Educational and Psychological Measurement, Vol. 68, No. 3, 06.2008, p. 515-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huffman, Ann H ; Youngcourt, Satoris S. ; Payne, Stephanie C. ; Castro, Carl A. / The importance of construct breadth when examining interrole conflict. In: Educational and Psychological Measurement. 2008 ; Vol. 68, No. 3. pp. 515-530.
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