The development of folds and cleavages in slate belts by underplating in accretionary complexes

a comparison of the Kodiak Formation, Alaska and the Calaveras Complex, California

S. R. Paterson, James C Sample

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of folds and cleavages in slate and graywacke belts is commonly attributed to arc-continent or continent-continent collisions. However, the Kodiak Formation of southern Alaska and the Calaveras Complex of the western Sierra Nevada, California, are two slate and graywacke belts in which folds and slaty cleavages developed during simple underthrusting and underplating within accretionary wedges. Peak metamorphism in these belts indicates that they were accreted in accretionary wedges with geothermal gradients higher than usually assumed for such tectonic settings; such wedges may have been fairly common features at convergent margins. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)859-874
Number of pages16
JournalTectonics
Volume7
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Slate
slate
underplating
continents
wedges
cleavage
graywacke
accretionary prism
fold
convergent margin
geothermal gradient
Tectonics
tectonic setting
margins
tectonics
metamorphism
arcs
collision
gradients
collisions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

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abstract = "The development of folds and cleavages in slate and graywacke belts is commonly attributed to arc-continent or continent-continent collisions. However, the Kodiak Formation of southern Alaska and the Calaveras Complex of the western Sierra Nevada, California, are two slate and graywacke belts in which folds and slaty cleavages developed during simple underthrusting and underplating within accretionary wedges. Peak metamorphism in these belts indicates that they were accreted in accretionary wedges with geothermal gradients higher than usually assumed for such tectonic settings; such wedges may have been fairly common features at convergent margins. -from Authors",
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AU - Sample, James C

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Y1 - 1988

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AB - The development of folds and cleavages in slate and graywacke belts is commonly attributed to arc-continent or continent-continent collisions. However, the Kodiak Formation of southern Alaska and the Calaveras Complex of the western Sierra Nevada, California, are two slate and graywacke belts in which folds and slaty cleavages developed during simple underthrusting and underplating within accretionary wedges. Peak metamorphism in these belts indicates that they were accreted in accretionary wedges with geothermal gradients higher than usually assumed for such tectonic settings; such wedges may have been fairly common features at convergent margins. -from Authors

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