Technology and tenure

Creating oppositional discourse in an offline and online world

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, I look at the complexity of the technorhetorician's place within academic institutions that promote traditional retention, promotion, and tenure procedures. First, I point out the shortcomings of current positionalities assigned to technorhetoricians. I then expand on theories of opposition as defined by Chela Sandoval (1994) in "Re-entering Cyberspace: Sciences of Resistance." I use this framework to look at the problems when creating binaries to identify online and offline work as traditional or marginal. I argue that we are a diverse and multilayered group whose members occupy many positions, emphasizing the shifting and sometimes contradictory nature of marginality in cyberspace. I conclude by pointing out possible effects of our diverse positionalities on our retention, tenure, and promotion efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-55
Number of pages15
JournalComputers and Composition
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2000

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virtual reality
promotion
discourse
marginality
group membership
opposition
science
Tenure
Cyberspace
Positionality
Discourse
Marginality
Contradictory

Keywords

  • Differential movement
  • Evaluation procedures
  • Ideological frameworks
  • Marginality in cyberspace
  • Technology and tenure
  • Theories of opposition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Technology and tenure : Creating oppositional discourse in an offline and online world. / Gruber, Sibylle.

In: Computers and Composition, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2000, p. 41-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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