Stomatal acclimation to increased CO2 concentration in a Florida scrub oak species Quercus myrtifolia Willd

R. J. Lodge, Paul Dijkstra, B. G. Drake, James I L Morison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Native scrub-oak communities in Florida were exposed for three seasons in open top chambers to present atmospheric [CO2] (approx. 350 μmol mol-1) and to high [CO2] (increased by 350 μmol mol-1). Stomatal and photosynthetic acclimation to high [CO2] of the dominant species Quercus myrtifolia was examined by leaf gas exchange of excised shoots. Stomatal conductance (gs) was approximately 40% lower in the high- compared to low-[CO2]-grown plants when measured at their respective growth concentrations. Reciprocal measurements of gs in both high- and low-[CO2]-grown plants showed that there was negative acclimation in the high-[CO2]-grown plants (9-16% reduction in gs when measured at 700 μmol mol-1), but these were small compared to those for net CO2 assimilation rate (A, 21-36%). Stomatal acclimation was more clearly evident in the curve of stomatal response to intercellular [CO2] (ci) which showed a reduction in stomatal sensitivity at low i in the high-[CO2]-grown plants. Stomatal density showed no change in response to growth in high growth [CO2]. Long-term stomatal and photosynthetic acclimation to growth in high [CO2] did not markedly change the 2.5- to 3-fold increase in gas-exchange-derived water use efficiency caused by high [CO2].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-88
Number of pages12
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Quercus
Acclimatization
shrublands
acclimation
Growth
gas exchange
Gases
water use efficiency
stomatal conductance
assimilation (physiology)
shoots
Quercus myrtifolia
Water
leaves

Keywords

  • Acclimation
  • Increased atmospheric CO
  • Scrub oak
  • Stomata
  • Water use efficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Stomatal acclimation to increased CO2 concentration in a Florida scrub oak species Quercus myrtifolia Willd. / Lodge, R. J.; Dijkstra, Paul; Drake, B. G.; Morison, James I L.

In: Plant, Cell and Environment, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2001, p. 77-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Native scrub-oak communities in Florida were exposed for three seasons in open top chambers to present atmospheric [CO2] (approx. 350 μmol mol-1) and to high [CO2] (increased by 350 μmol mol-1). Stomatal and photosynthetic acclimation to high [CO2] of the dominant species Quercus myrtifolia was examined by leaf gas exchange of excised shoots. Stomatal conductance (gs) was approximately 40% lower in the high- compared to low-[CO2]-grown plants when measured at their respective growth concentrations. Reciprocal measurements of gs in both high- and low-[CO2]-grown plants showed that there was negative acclimation in the high-[CO2]-grown plants (9-16% reduction in gs when measured at 700 μmol mol-1), but these were small compared to those for net CO2 assimilation rate (A, 21-36%). Stomatal acclimation was more clearly evident in the curve of stomatal response to intercellular [CO2] (ci) which showed a reduction in stomatal sensitivity at low i in the high-[CO2]-grown plants. Stomatal density showed no change in response to growth in high growth [CO2]. Long-term stomatal and photosynthetic acclimation to growth in high [CO2] did not markedly change the 2.5- to 3-fold increase in gas-exchange-derived water use efficiency caused by high [CO2].

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