Species richness and soil properties in Pinus ponderosa forests: A structural equation modeling analysis

Daniel C. Laughlin, Scott R. Abella, Wallace W Covington, James B. Grace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Question: How are the effects of mineral soil properties on understory plant species richness propagated through a network of processes involving the forest overstory, soil organic matter, soil nitrogen, and understory plant abundance? Location: North-central Arizona, USA. Methods: We sampled 75 0.05-ha plots across a broad soil gradient in a Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine) forest ecosystem. We evaluated multivariate models of plant species richness using structural equation modeling. Results: Richness was highest at intermediate levels of understory plant cover, suggesting that both colonization success and competitive exclusion can limit richness in this system. We did not detect a reciprocal positive effect of richness on plant cover. Richness was strongly related to soil nitrogen in the model, with evidence for both a direct negative effect and an indirect non-linear relationship mediated through understory plant cover. Soil organic matter appeared to have a positive influence on understory richness that was independent of soil nitrogen. Richness was lowest where the forest overstory was densest, which can be explained through indirect effects on soil organic matter, soil nitrogen and understory cover. Finally, model results suggest a variety of direct and indirect processes whereby mineral soil properties can influence richness. Conclusions: Understory plant species richness and plant cover in P. ponderosa forests appear to be significantly influenced by soil organic matter and nitrogen, which are, in turn, related to overstory density and composition and mineral soil properties. Thus, soil properties can impose direct and indirect constraints on local species diversity in ponderosa pine forests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-242
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Vegetation Science
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Fingerprint

Pinus ponderosa
understory
soil properties
soil property
Soil
species richness
species diversity
ground cover plants
soil nitrogen
soil organic matter
overstory
modeling
mineral soils
Nitrogen
soil
nitrogen
coniferous forests
mineral
Minerals
competitive exclusion

Keywords

  • Diversity
  • Nitrogen
  • Organic matter
  • Populus tremuloides
  • Soil texture
  • Structural equation modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Parasitology
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Species richness and soil properties in Pinus ponderosa forests : A structural equation modeling analysis. / Laughlin, Daniel C.; Abella, Scott R.; Covington, Wallace W; Grace, James B.

In: Journal of Vegetation Science, Vol. 18, No. 2, 04.2007, p. 231-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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