Small changes approach promotes initial and continued weight loss with a phone-based followup

Nine-month outcomes From ASPIRES II

Lesley D. Lutes, Suzanne R Daiss, Steven D Barger, Margaret Read, Emily Steinbaugh, Richard A. Winett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To examine the impact of a small-changes weight loss program across a 3-month intervention followed by a 6-month follow-up program. Design. A one-group pre-post intervention study. Setting. Medium-sized Southwestern university. Participants. Twenty-five obese adult women (mean body mass index [BMI] = 31.8 kg/m 2, standard deviation [SD] = 4.9). Intervention. Participants were asked to choose and adopt small changes in their diet and physical activity relative to baseline during weekly group-based meetings over 3 months. Participants then received bi-weekly phone calls across a 6-month follow-up period. Measures. Weight change was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included waist circumference, daily step count, and caloric intake. Analyses. Intention-to-treat analysis of change from baseline and completers-only analysis (n = 22) for secondary outcomes. Results. Participants achieved clinically significant weight loss (mean [M]= 23.2 kg, standard error [SE] = 47 kg, p < .001) across the initial small changes treatment program. Moreover, participants continued to lose weight across the 6-month phone-based follow-up program (M = 22.1 kg, SE = .83 kg, p < .017), totaling.5% weight loss across the 9-month program (M = 5.3 kg, SE = 1.1 kg, p <.001). Conclusion. Using a small changes approach, participants achieved weight loss in an initial group-based program, which continued with minimal phone-based follow-up. Larger randomized studies comparing a small changes approach to traditional obesity treatment are warranted. (Am J Health Promot 2012;26[4]:235-238.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-238
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Weight Loss
Weight Reduction Programs
Weights and Measures
Intention to Treat Analysis
Group Processes
Waist Circumference
Energy Intake
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Exercise
Diet
Group
Health
Therapeutics
university
health

Keywords

  • Group Therapy
  • Intervention
  • Lifestyle
  • Obesity
  • Pedometer
  • Physical Activity
  • Prevention Research
  • Small Changes
  • Theory
  • Weight Loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Small changes approach promotes initial and continued weight loss with a phone-based followup : Nine-month outcomes From ASPIRES II. / Lutes, Lesley D.; Daiss, Suzanne R; Barger, Steven D; Read, Margaret; Steinbaugh, Emily; Winett, Richard A.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 26, No. 4, 03.2012, p. 235-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose. To examine the impact of a small-changes weight loss program across a 3-month intervention followed by a 6-month follow-up program. Design. A one-group pre-post intervention study. Setting. Medium-sized Southwestern university. Participants. Twenty-five obese adult women (mean body mass index [BMI] = 31.8 kg/m 2, standard deviation [SD] = 4.9). Intervention. Participants were asked to choose and adopt small changes in their diet and physical activity relative to baseline during weekly group-based meetings over 3 months. Participants then received bi-weekly phone calls across a 6-month follow-up period. Measures. Weight change was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included waist circumference, daily step count, and caloric intake. Analyses. Intention-to-treat analysis of change from baseline and completers-only analysis (n = 22) for secondary outcomes. Results. Participants achieved clinically significant weight loss (mean [M]= 23.2 kg, standard error [SE] = 47 kg, p < .001) across the initial small changes treatment program. Moreover, participants continued to lose weight across the 6-month phone-based follow-up program (M = 22.1 kg, SE = .83 kg, p < .017), totaling.5{\%} weight loss across the 9-month program (M = 5.3 kg, SE = 1.1 kg, p <.001). Conclusion. Using a small changes approach, participants achieved weight loss in an initial group-based program, which continued with minimal phone-based follow-up. Larger randomized studies comparing a small changes approach to traditional obesity treatment are warranted. (Am J Health Promot 2012;26[4]:235-238.).",
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