Shifts in the importance of the species pool and environmental controls of epiphytic bryophyte richness across multiple scales

Nagore G. Medina, Matthew A Bowker, Joaquín Hortal, Vicente Mazimpaka, Francisco Lara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Species richness is influenced by a nested set of environmental factors, but how do these factors interact across several scales? Our main aim is to disentangle the relative importance of environmental filters and the species pool on the richness of epiphytic bryophytes across spatial scales. To do so, we sampled epiphytic bryophytes in 43 oak forests across the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula. As predictors we used climate, descriptors of forest structure and micro-environment. We applied structural equation modeling to relate these variables with richness and cover at three scales: locality (forest), stand (three stands per forest), and sample (a quadrate in a tree). We assumed top–down relationships, so that large-scale variables influenced lower scale variables, and in which cover directly influenced richness. Richness at the next larger scale (locality to stand and stand to sample) is considered a surrogate of the species pool and included as a predictor of richness at the next smaller scale. Environmental variables explain locality richness, but as we decrease the spatial scale, its importance decreases and the dependence on species pool increases. In addition, we found unexpected bottom–up relationships (between micro-scale environment to locality richness). Our results point to the scale dependence of niche vs. neutral processes: niche processes are important at the locality (forest) scale, while neutral processes are significant at the small (sample) scale. We propose a modified conceptualization of the factors influencing biodiversity at different spatial scales by adding links across different scales (between micro-environment and locality-scale richness in our study).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalOecologia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 18 2018

Fingerprint

species pool
bryophyte
niches
niche
environmental factors
Iberian Peninsula
sampling
forest stands
Quercus
biodiversity
climate
species diversity
environmental factor
species richness
environmental control
Bryophyta
filter
modeling

Keywords

  • Diversity
  • Neutral processes
  • Plant
  • Regional species pool
  • Scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Shifts in the importance of the species pool and environmental controls of epiphytic bryophyte richness across multiple scales. / Medina, Nagore G.; Bowker, Matthew A; Hortal, Joaquín; Mazimpaka, Vicente; Lara, Francisco.

In: Oecologia, 18.01.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0d612e6428de4895a32c7495ca3e9a6f,
title = "Shifts in the importance of the species pool and environmental controls of epiphytic bryophyte richness across multiple scales",
abstract = "Species richness is influenced by a nested set of environmental factors, but how do these factors interact across several scales? Our main aim is to disentangle the relative importance of environmental filters and the species pool on the richness of epiphytic bryophytes across spatial scales. To do so, we sampled epiphytic bryophytes in 43 oak forests across the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula. As predictors we used climate, descriptors of forest structure and micro-environment. We applied structural equation modeling to relate these variables with richness and cover at three scales: locality (forest), stand (three stands per forest), and sample (a quadrate in a tree). We assumed top–down relationships, so that large-scale variables influenced lower scale variables, and in which cover directly influenced richness. Richness at the next larger scale (locality to stand and stand to sample) is considered a surrogate of the species pool and included as a predictor of richness at the next smaller scale. Environmental variables explain locality richness, but as we decrease the spatial scale, its importance decreases and the dependence on species pool increases. In addition, we found unexpected bottom–up relationships (between micro-scale environment to locality richness). Our results point to the scale dependence of niche vs. neutral processes: niche processes are important at the locality (forest) scale, while neutral processes are significant at the small (sample) scale. We propose a modified conceptualization of the factors influencing biodiversity at different spatial scales by adding links across different scales (between micro-environment and locality-scale richness in our study).",
keywords = "Diversity, Neutral processes, Plant, Regional species pool, Scale",
author = "Medina, {Nagore G.} and Bowker, {Matthew A} and Joaqu{\'i}n Hortal and Vicente Mazimpaka and Francisco Lara",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1007/s00442-018-4066-x",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--12",
journal = "Oecologia",
issn = "0029-8519",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Shifts in the importance of the species pool and environmental controls of epiphytic bryophyte richness across multiple scales

AU - Medina, Nagore G.

AU - Bowker, Matthew A

AU - Hortal, Joaquín

AU - Mazimpaka, Vicente

AU - Lara, Francisco

PY - 2018/1/18

Y1 - 2018/1/18

N2 - Species richness is influenced by a nested set of environmental factors, but how do these factors interact across several scales? Our main aim is to disentangle the relative importance of environmental filters and the species pool on the richness of epiphytic bryophytes across spatial scales. To do so, we sampled epiphytic bryophytes in 43 oak forests across the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula. As predictors we used climate, descriptors of forest structure and micro-environment. We applied structural equation modeling to relate these variables with richness and cover at three scales: locality (forest), stand (three stands per forest), and sample (a quadrate in a tree). We assumed top–down relationships, so that large-scale variables influenced lower scale variables, and in which cover directly influenced richness. Richness at the next larger scale (locality to stand and stand to sample) is considered a surrogate of the species pool and included as a predictor of richness at the next smaller scale. Environmental variables explain locality richness, but as we decrease the spatial scale, its importance decreases and the dependence on species pool increases. In addition, we found unexpected bottom–up relationships (between micro-scale environment to locality richness). Our results point to the scale dependence of niche vs. neutral processes: niche processes are important at the locality (forest) scale, while neutral processes are significant at the small (sample) scale. We propose a modified conceptualization of the factors influencing biodiversity at different spatial scales by adding links across different scales (between micro-environment and locality-scale richness in our study).

AB - Species richness is influenced by a nested set of environmental factors, but how do these factors interact across several scales? Our main aim is to disentangle the relative importance of environmental filters and the species pool on the richness of epiphytic bryophytes across spatial scales. To do so, we sampled epiphytic bryophytes in 43 oak forests across the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula. As predictors we used climate, descriptors of forest structure and micro-environment. We applied structural equation modeling to relate these variables with richness and cover at three scales: locality (forest), stand (three stands per forest), and sample (a quadrate in a tree). We assumed top–down relationships, so that large-scale variables influenced lower scale variables, and in which cover directly influenced richness. Richness at the next larger scale (locality to stand and stand to sample) is considered a surrogate of the species pool and included as a predictor of richness at the next smaller scale. Environmental variables explain locality richness, but as we decrease the spatial scale, its importance decreases and the dependence on species pool increases. In addition, we found unexpected bottom–up relationships (between micro-scale environment to locality richness). Our results point to the scale dependence of niche vs. neutral processes: niche processes are important at the locality (forest) scale, while neutral processes are significant at the small (sample) scale. We propose a modified conceptualization of the factors influencing biodiversity at different spatial scales by adding links across different scales (between micro-environment and locality-scale richness in our study).

KW - Diversity

KW - Neutral processes

KW - Plant

KW - Regional species pool

KW - Scale

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040785675&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040785675&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00442-018-4066-x

DO - 10.1007/s00442-018-4066-x

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - Oecologia

JF - Oecologia

SN - 0029-8519

ER -