Sensitivity of resource selection and connectivity models to landscape definition

Katherine A. Zeller, Kevin McGarigal, Samuel A. Cushman, Paul Beier, T. Winston Vickers, Walter M. Boyce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: The definition of the geospatial landscape is the underlying basis for species-habitat models, yet sensitivity of habitat use inference, predicted probability surfaces, and connectivity models to landscape definition has received little attention. Objectives: We evaluated the sensitivity of resource selection and connectivity models to four landscape definition choices including (1) the type of geospatial layers used, (2) layer source, (3) thematic resolution, and (4) spatial grain. Methods: We used GPS telemetry data from pumas (Puma concolor) in southern California to create multi-scale path selection function models (PathSFs) across landscapes with 2500 unique landscape definitions. To create the landscape definitions, we identified seven geospatial layers that have been shown to influence puma habitat use. We then varied the number, sources, spatial grain, and thematic resolutions of these layers to create our suite of plausible landscape definitions. We assessed how PathSF model performance (based on AIC) was affected by landscape definition and examined variability among the predicted probability of movement surfaces, connectivity models, and road crossing locations. Results: We found model performance was extremely sensitive to landscape definition and identified only seven top models out of our suite of definitions (<1%). Spatial grain and the number of geospatial layers selected for a landscape definition significantly affected model performance measures, with finer grains and greater numbers of layers increasing model performance. Conclusions: Given the sensitivity of habitat use inference, predicted probability surfaces, and connectivity models to landscape definition, out results indicate the need for increased attention to landscape definition in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)835-855
Number of pages21
JournalLandscape Ecology
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

resource selection
connectivity
resources
habitat
agricultural product
habitat use
performance
telemetry
GPS

Keywords

  • Connectivity
  • Corridor
  • Puma concolor
  • Resistance
  • Resource selection function
  • Spatial grain
  • Species-habitat relationships
  • Thematic resolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Zeller, K. A., McGarigal, K., Cushman, S. A., Beier, P., Vickers, T. W., & Boyce, W. M. (2017). Sensitivity of resource selection and connectivity models to landscape definition. Landscape Ecology, 32(4), 835-855. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-017-0489-8

Sensitivity of resource selection and connectivity models to landscape definition. / Zeller, Katherine A.; McGarigal, Kevin; Cushman, Samuel A.; Beier, Paul; Vickers, T. Winston; Boyce, Walter M.

In: Landscape Ecology, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 835-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zeller, KA, McGarigal, K, Cushman, SA, Beier, P, Vickers, TW & Boyce, WM 2017, 'Sensitivity of resource selection and connectivity models to landscape definition', Landscape Ecology, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 835-855. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-017-0489-8
Zeller, Katherine A. ; McGarigal, Kevin ; Cushman, Samuel A. ; Beier, Paul ; Vickers, T. Winston ; Boyce, Walter M. / Sensitivity of resource selection and connectivity models to landscape definition. In: Landscape Ecology. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 835-855.
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