Secondary ion mass spectrometry of sodium nitrate

Comparison of ReO4- and Cs+ primary ions

G. S. Groenewold, J. E. Delmore, J. E. Olson, A. D. Appelhans, Jani C Ingram, D. A. Dahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of perrhenate (rhenium tetroxide, ReO4-) as a bombarding particle was compared with Cs+ for its ability to generate molecular species from sodium nitrate. The purpose of the study was to quantitatively evaluate the enhancement in sputtering to be gained using a heavy, polyatomic primary particle. It was found that ReO4- is three to five times more efficient at generating ions such as Na2NO3+ and Na(NO3)2-. The nitrate-bearing molecular ions were observed to decrease in intensity as primary ion dose increases; at the same time, nitrite-bearing ions were observed to increase. This observation is interpreted in terms of beam damage to the surface of the target. Disappearance cross sections (σ) using ReO4- bombardment were measured as 960 and 690Å2 for Na2NO3+ and Na(NO3)2-, respectively. σ values measured using Cs+ bombardment were slightly larger. These measurements show that for an equivalent area of the sample disrupted, ReO4- is more effective for the production of nitrate-bearing secondary ions, which increases the probability of completing a measurement before extensive beam damage occurs. Secondary ion energies were evaluated and shown to be comparable for the ReO4- and Cs+ bombardment experiments; for this reason, sample charging is not deemed to be a significant factor in these experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-195
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes
Volume163
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sodium nitrates
Secondary ion mass spectrometry
secondary ion mass spectrometry
Nitrates
Bearings (structural)
Sodium
Ions
bombardment
ions
nitrates
damage
nitrites
Rhenium
rhenium
molecular ions
charging
Nitrites
sputtering
Sputtering
sodium nitrate

Keywords

  • Cesium
  • Disappearance cross section
  • Perrhenate
  • Secondary ion mass spectrometry
  • Sputter yield

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Secondary ion mass spectrometry of sodium nitrate : Comparison of ReO4- and Cs+ primary ions. / Groenewold, G. S.; Delmore, J. E.; Olson, J. E.; Appelhans, A. D.; Ingram, Jani C; Dahl, D. A.

In: International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes, Vol. 163, No. 3, 1997, p. 185-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Groenewold, G. S. ; Delmore, J. E. ; Olson, J. E. ; Appelhans, A. D. ; Ingram, Jani C ; Dahl, D. A. / Secondary ion mass spectrometry of sodium nitrate : Comparison of ReO4- and Cs+ primary ions. In: International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes. 1997 ; Vol. 163, No. 3. pp. 185-195.
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