Root influence on nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in avena barbata rhizosphere soil

D. J. Herman, K. K. Johnson, C. H. Jaeger, Egbert Schwartz, M. K. Firestone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Micro-15N pool dilution was used to quantify rates of gross N mineralization, consumption, and nitrification in bulk soil and in soil within 2 mm of root sections of Avena barbata (slender wild oats), an annual grass common to California oak woodland-savannas. Rates of gross N mineralization in rhizosphere soil (9.2 mg N kg-1d-1) were about ten times higher than in bulk soil (1.0 mg N Kg-1d-1). Total bacterial numbers in soil adjacent to roots were slightly higher than in bulk soil; protozoa biomass was not measurably different. Changes in bacterial numbers or standing stocks of bacterial N could not account for rates of N mineralization. Nitrification potential values were similar in bulk and rhizosphere soil, yet gross rates of nitrification were highly dependent on location along the root. Gross nitrification rates in soil near the root tip were the same as those in bulk soil, while rapid uptake of NH4 by older sections of root (8-16 cm from the tip), appeared to limit nitrification rates. Only small differences in microbial community structure between bulk and rhizosphere soil were detected by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis. While the small increases in bacterial numbers and changes in community composition may in-part explain the increased rates of N mineralization, other microbial-root interactions are likely involved in accelerating the flux of N from organic sources to the plant-available NH 4 pool. The high rates of N mineralization observed in soil immediately adjacent to roots should facilitate plant access to N. Most of the stocks and fluxes determined in these studies exhibited distinct spatial patterns along the plant root that may have significantly impacted N-availability to the plant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1504-1511
Number of pages8
JournalSoil Science Society of America Journal
Volume70
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Avena barbata
nitrification
rhizosphere
mineralization
nitrogen
soil
rate
biomass
root tips
savanna
community composition
savannas
Protozoa
microbial communities
oats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Root influence on nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in avena barbata rhizosphere soil. / Herman, D. J.; Johnson, K. K.; Jaeger, C. H.; Schwartz, Egbert; Firestone, M. K.

In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, Vol. 70, No. 5, 09.2006, p. 1504-1511.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Herman, D. J. ; Johnson, K. K. ; Jaeger, C. H. ; Schwartz, Egbert ; Firestone, M. K. / Root influence on nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in avena barbata rhizosphere soil. In: Soil Science Society of America Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 70, No. 5. pp. 1504-1511.
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