Responses of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling to Climate Change Treatments Along an Elevation Gradient

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Global temperature increases and precipitation changes are both expected to alter ecosystem carbon (C) cycling. We tested responses of ecosystem C cycling to simulated climate change using field manipulations of temperature and precipitation across a range of grass-dominated ecosystems along an elevation gradient in northern Arizona. In 2002, we transplanted intact plant-soil mesocosms to simulate warming and used passive interceptors and collectors to manipulate precipitation. We measured daytime ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem C exchange throughout the growing season in 2008 and 2009. Warming generally stimulated ER and photosynthesis, but had variable effects on daytime net C exchange. Increased precipitation stimulated ecosystem C cycling only in the driest ecosystem at the lowest elevation, whereas decreased precipitation showed no effects on ecosystem C cycling across all ecosystems. No significant interaction between temperature and precipitation treatments was observed. Structural equation modeling revealed that in the wetter-than-average year of 2008, changes in ecosystem C cycling were more strongly affected by warming-induced reduction in soil moisture than by altered precipitation. In contrast, during the drier year of 2009, warming induced increase in soil temperature rather than changes in soil moisture determined ecosystem C cycling. Our findings suggest that warming exerted the strongest influence on ecosystem C cycling in both years, by modulating soil moisture in the wet year and soil temperature in the dry year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1066-1080
Number of pages15
JournalEcosystems
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Fingerprint

Climate change
Ecosystems
Carbon
climate change
ecosystems
carbon
ecosystem
warming
Soil moisture
ecosystem respiration
soil water
soil moisture
soil temperature
Soils
respiration
Temperature
temperature
collectors
Photosynthesis
Precipitation (meteorology)

Keywords

  • ecosystem respiration
  • gross ecosystem photosynthesis
  • net ecosystem exchange
  • precipitation
  • structural equation model
  • warming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

@article{fc9c0aba80f743269088bed9188d538c,
title = "Responses of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling to Climate Change Treatments Along an Elevation Gradient",
abstract = "Global temperature increases and precipitation changes are both expected to alter ecosystem carbon (C) cycling. We tested responses of ecosystem C cycling to simulated climate change using field manipulations of temperature and precipitation across a range of grass-dominated ecosystems along an elevation gradient in northern Arizona. In 2002, we transplanted intact plant-soil mesocosms to simulate warming and used passive interceptors and collectors to manipulate precipitation. We measured daytime ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem C exchange throughout the growing season in 2008 and 2009. Warming generally stimulated ER and photosynthesis, but had variable effects on daytime net C exchange. Increased precipitation stimulated ecosystem C cycling only in the driest ecosystem at the lowest elevation, whereas decreased precipitation showed no effects on ecosystem C cycling across all ecosystems. No significant interaction between temperature and precipitation treatments was observed. Structural equation modeling revealed that in the wetter-than-average year of 2008, changes in ecosystem C cycling were more strongly affected by warming-induced reduction in soil moisture than by altered precipitation. In contrast, during the drier year of 2009, warming induced increase in soil temperature rather than changes in soil moisture determined ecosystem C cycling. Our findings suggest that warming exerted the strongest influence on ecosystem C cycling in both years, by modulating soil moisture in the wet year and soil temperature in the dry year.",
keywords = "ecosystem respiration, gross ecosystem photosynthesis, net ecosystem exchange, precipitation, structural equation model, warming",
author = "Zhuoting Wu and Koch, {George W} and Paul Dijkstra and Bowker, {Matthew A} and Hungate, {Bruce A}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1007/s10021-011-9464-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "1066--1080",
journal = "Ecosystems",
issn = "1432-9840",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Responses of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling to Climate Change Treatments Along an Elevation Gradient

AU - Wu, Zhuoting

AU - Koch, George W

AU - Dijkstra, Paul

AU - Bowker, Matthew A

AU - Hungate, Bruce A

PY - 2011/11

Y1 - 2011/11

N2 - Global temperature increases and precipitation changes are both expected to alter ecosystem carbon (C) cycling. We tested responses of ecosystem C cycling to simulated climate change using field manipulations of temperature and precipitation across a range of grass-dominated ecosystems along an elevation gradient in northern Arizona. In 2002, we transplanted intact plant-soil mesocosms to simulate warming and used passive interceptors and collectors to manipulate precipitation. We measured daytime ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem C exchange throughout the growing season in 2008 and 2009. Warming generally stimulated ER and photosynthesis, but had variable effects on daytime net C exchange. Increased precipitation stimulated ecosystem C cycling only in the driest ecosystem at the lowest elevation, whereas decreased precipitation showed no effects on ecosystem C cycling across all ecosystems. No significant interaction between temperature and precipitation treatments was observed. Structural equation modeling revealed that in the wetter-than-average year of 2008, changes in ecosystem C cycling were more strongly affected by warming-induced reduction in soil moisture than by altered precipitation. In contrast, during the drier year of 2009, warming induced increase in soil temperature rather than changes in soil moisture determined ecosystem C cycling. Our findings suggest that warming exerted the strongest influence on ecosystem C cycling in both years, by modulating soil moisture in the wet year and soil temperature in the dry year.

AB - Global temperature increases and precipitation changes are both expected to alter ecosystem carbon (C) cycling. We tested responses of ecosystem C cycling to simulated climate change using field manipulations of temperature and precipitation across a range of grass-dominated ecosystems along an elevation gradient in northern Arizona. In 2002, we transplanted intact plant-soil mesocosms to simulate warming and used passive interceptors and collectors to manipulate precipitation. We measured daytime ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem C exchange throughout the growing season in 2008 and 2009. Warming generally stimulated ER and photosynthesis, but had variable effects on daytime net C exchange. Increased precipitation stimulated ecosystem C cycling only in the driest ecosystem at the lowest elevation, whereas decreased precipitation showed no effects on ecosystem C cycling across all ecosystems. No significant interaction between temperature and precipitation treatments was observed. Structural equation modeling revealed that in the wetter-than-average year of 2008, changes in ecosystem C cycling were more strongly affected by warming-induced reduction in soil moisture than by altered precipitation. In contrast, during the drier year of 2009, warming induced increase in soil temperature rather than changes in soil moisture determined ecosystem C cycling. Our findings suggest that warming exerted the strongest influence on ecosystem C cycling in both years, by modulating soil moisture in the wet year and soil temperature in the dry year.

KW - ecosystem respiration

KW - gross ecosystem photosynthesis

KW - net ecosystem exchange

KW - precipitation

KW - structural equation model

KW - warming

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80855143617&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80855143617&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10021-011-9464-4

DO - 10.1007/s10021-011-9464-4

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 1066

EP - 1080

JO - Ecosystems

JF - Ecosystems

SN - 1432-9840

IS - 7

ER -