Remembering Left-Right Orientation of Pictures

James C. Bartlett, Morton Ann Gernsbacher, Robert E Till

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a study of recognition memory for pictures, we observed an asymmetry in classifying test items as "same" versus "different" in left-right orientation: Identical copies of previously viewed items were classified more accurately than left-right reversals of those items. Response bias could not explain this asymmetry, and, moreover, correct "same" and "different" classifications were independently manipulable: Whereas repetition of input pictures (one vs. two presentations) affected primarily correct "same" classifications, retention interval (3 hr vs. 1 week) affected primarily correct "different" classifications. In addition, repetition but not retention interval affected judgments that previously seen pictures (both identical and reversed) were "old." These and additional findings supported a dual-process hypothesis that links "same" classifications to high familiarity, and "different" classifications to conscious sampling of images of previously viewed pictures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-35
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Volume13
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1987
Externally publishedYes

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asymmetry
Remembering
trend
Asymmetry
Recognition (Psychology)
Retention (Psychology)
Response Bias
Sampling
Conscious
Dual Process
Recognition Memory
Familiarity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Remembering Left-Right Orientation of Pictures. / Bartlett, James C.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Till, Robert E.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.1987, p. 27-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bartlett, James C. ; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann ; Till, Robert E. / Remembering Left-Right Orientation of Pictures. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 1987 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 27-35.
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