Relationship of oxygen consumption and cardiac output to work of breathing

Richard J Coast, K. M. Krause

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between work of breathing and estimated blood flow to and oxygen consumption by the respiratory muscles. Five subjects performed inspiratory loaded breathing and voluntary hyperpnea while ventilatory work, cardiac output, and oxygen consumption were measured. Blood flow to and oxygen consumption by the respiratory muscles were estimated by subtracting the resting from the working values of cardiac output and oxygen consumption, respectively. Loaded breathing increased cardiac output, but there was no significant correlation with work of breathing, while oxygen consumption was significantly correlated with work of breathing. During hyperpnea both cardiac output and oxygen consumption were correlated with work of breathing. Our results indicate that blood flow and oxygen consumption are increased in a regular pattern with increases in work of breathing. These results may be significant in estimating the demand of the respiratory muscles in disease and exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-340
Number of pages6
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume25
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Work of Breathing
Oxygen Consumption
Cardiac Output
Respiratory Muscles
Respiration

Keywords

  • CARDIAC OUTPUT
  • DIAPHRAGM
  • MUSCLE ENERGETICS
  • WORK OF BREATHING

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Relationship of oxygen consumption and cardiac output to work of breathing. / Coast, Richard J; Krause, K. M.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 25, No. 3, 1993, p. 335-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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