Reference conditions and historical changes in an unharvested ponderosa pine stand on sedimentary soil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Much of the previous research on spatial reference conditions in dry frequent fire pine forests have come from stand-level patterns under regionally average ecosystem conditions (e.g. soil type and precipitation). We evaluated the 1883 reference conditions of an uncut ponderosa pine stand representing a far end of the range of variability in terms of regionally unusual environmental conditions. Using a forest reconstruction model, univariate and bivariate Ripley's K functions, and regression analysis, we determined 1883 structural and spatial reference conditions, and compared those to the contemporary (2010) stand. Historical stand density was 77 trees/ha with a basal area of 8.0 m2/ha. Reference spatial patterns were significantly aggregated from 1 to 2 m and randomly distributed at distances greater than 2 m. Nearly 40% of the reconstructed trees were individuals, the average patch size was 2.9 trees, and the largest patch had 7 members. The contemporary stand had considerably greater densities and basal area than historical conditions and showed aggregation at all distances. Bivariate spatial analysis indicated attraction of post-settlement recruitment to live pre-settlement trees from 1 to 6 m and no association at distances greater than 6 m. We speculate that the historically random tree pattern is the product of a variety of factors including soil parent material, climate, and more homogeneous resource partitioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-221
Number of pages10
JournalRestoration Ecology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

sedimentary soils
Pinus ponderosa
basal area
soil
soil parent materials
niche partitioning
patch size
stand density
parent material
forest fire
spatial analysis
coniferous forests
soil type
soil types
regression analysis
environmental conditions
climate
environmental factors
ecosystems
ecosystem

Keywords

  • Complete spatial randomness
  • Ecological restoration
  • Natural range of variability
  • Pinus ponderosa
  • Spatial patterns

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Reference conditions and historical changes in an unharvested ponderosa pine stand on sedimentary soil. / Schneider, Eryn E.; Sanchez Meador, Andrew J; Covington, Wallace W.

In: Restoration Ecology, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.03.2016, p. 212-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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