Reduplication and reciprocity in imagining community

The play of tropes in a rural bangladeshi moot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The trope of the "body politic" is reproduced in a Bengali popular court, or moot, not only through explicit submetaphors of that master metaphor but through a grammatical example of what Peirce called diagrammatic iconism. The iconism of reduplicated verbs with reciprocal meaning became pivotal in the metacommunicative negotiation of the agenda of a rural Bangladeshi moot. Such forms of iconicity analyzed here play traceable roles in particular imaginations of community and give us an opportunity to explore the accessibility of those imaginations to discursive consciousness. The article concludes that the tropes most powerfully shaping the discourse of the moot are those least accessible to metapragmatic consciousness, those that rhetorically contribute to the veiling of their own rhetoricity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)188-222
Number of pages35
JournalJournal of Linguistic Anthropology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

reciprocity
consciousness
role play
community
metaphor
discourse
imagination
Tropes
Consciousness
Imagining
Reduplication
Discursive
Body Politics
Accessibility
Verbs
Metapragmatics
Veiling
Iconicity
Discourse
Agenda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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