Quiet ego, self-regulatory skills, and perceived stress in college students

Heidi A Wayment, Keragan Cavolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Examine the unique contributions of self-control and grit subscales (perseverance, interest consistency) as potential mediators of the relationship between quiet ego characteristics and less perceived stress in college students. Participants: Data from 1117 college students were collected between October, 2015 and May, 2016. Methods: The sample was split randomly into exploratory and confirmatory samples. Multiple mediator models were tested with PROCESS module (SPSS v. 24) in both samples. Results: Hypotheses were largely confirmed with self-control fully mediating the link between quiet ego and perceived stress in both samples. Conclusions: Although many self-regulatory constructs may argue for their positive impact on college student outcomes, interventions that strengthen self-control, and not grit, may be most promising to reduce perceived stress. Further, interventions to strengthen quiet ego characteristics may be beneficial for strengthening self-control in college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 21 2018

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Keywords

  • Grit
  • perceived stress
  • quiet ego
  • self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Quiet ego, self-regulatory skills, and perceived stress in college students. / Wayment, Heidi A; Cavolo, Keragan.

In: Journal of American College Health, 21.06.2018, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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