Professor–Student Rapport and Perceived Autonomy Support as Predictors of Course and Student Outcomes

Meliksah Demir, Shelby Burton, Nora Dunbar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Two robust predictors of student success, rapport, and autonomy support were assessed to determine which had a greater impact on course and student outcomes. Survey responses from undergraduate psychology students (n = 412) were collected. Together, rapport and autonomy support explained substantial variance in professor effectiveness (R2 =.72), perception of the course (R2 =.49), and perceived amount learned (R2 =.27). However, rapport accounted for more unique variance than autonomy support. To a lesser degree, these predictors explained variability in expected (R2 =.07) and actual (R2 =.04) final grade, and absences (R2 =.04). Autonomy support was the only significant predictor of grades. Providing professional development opportunities to professors to enhance rapport and autonomy support may improve student success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-33
Number of pages12
JournalTeaching of Psychology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

autonomy
Students
student
university teacher
psychology student
Psychology

Keywords

  • actual grades
  • autonomy support
  • course outcomes
  • professor–student rapport
  • student learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Professor–Student Rapport and Perceived Autonomy Support as Predictors of Course and Student Outcomes. / Demir, Meliksah; Burton, Shelby; Dunbar, Nora.

In: Teaching of Psychology, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 22-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4892998918da45119b9c4f554f3bbc7c,
title = "Professor–Student Rapport and Perceived Autonomy Support as Predictors of Course and Student Outcomes",
abstract = "Two robust predictors of student success, rapport, and autonomy support were assessed to determine which had a greater impact on course and student outcomes. Survey responses from undergraduate psychology students (n = 412) were collected. Together, rapport and autonomy support explained substantial variance in professor effectiveness (R2 =.72), perception of the course (R2 =.49), and perceived amount learned (R2 =.27). However, rapport accounted for more unique variance than autonomy support. To a lesser degree, these predictors explained variability in expected (R2 =.07) and actual (R2 =.04) final grade, and absences (R2 =.04). Autonomy support was the only significant predictor of grades. Providing professional development opportunities to professors to enhance rapport and autonomy support may improve student success.",
keywords = "actual grades, autonomy support, course outcomes, professor–student rapport, student learning",
author = "Meliksah Demir and Shelby Burton and Nora Dunbar",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0098628318816132",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "22--33",
journal = "Teaching of Psychology",
issn = "0098-6283",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Professor–Student Rapport and Perceived Autonomy Support as Predictors of Course and Student Outcomes

AU - Demir, Meliksah

AU - Burton, Shelby

AU - Dunbar, Nora

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Two robust predictors of student success, rapport, and autonomy support were assessed to determine which had a greater impact on course and student outcomes. Survey responses from undergraduate psychology students (n = 412) were collected. Together, rapport and autonomy support explained substantial variance in professor effectiveness (R2 =.72), perception of the course (R2 =.49), and perceived amount learned (R2 =.27). However, rapport accounted for more unique variance than autonomy support. To a lesser degree, these predictors explained variability in expected (R2 =.07) and actual (R2 =.04) final grade, and absences (R2 =.04). Autonomy support was the only significant predictor of grades. Providing professional development opportunities to professors to enhance rapport and autonomy support may improve student success.

AB - Two robust predictors of student success, rapport, and autonomy support were assessed to determine which had a greater impact on course and student outcomes. Survey responses from undergraduate psychology students (n = 412) were collected. Together, rapport and autonomy support explained substantial variance in professor effectiveness (R2 =.72), perception of the course (R2 =.49), and perceived amount learned (R2 =.27). However, rapport accounted for more unique variance than autonomy support. To a lesser degree, these predictors explained variability in expected (R2 =.07) and actual (R2 =.04) final grade, and absences (R2 =.04). Autonomy support was the only significant predictor of grades. Providing professional development opportunities to professors to enhance rapport and autonomy support may improve student success.

KW - actual grades

KW - autonomy support

KW - course outcomes

KW - professor–student rapport

KW - student learning

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058809430&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058809430&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0098628318816132

DO - 10.1177/0098628318816132

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85058809430

VL - 46

SP - 22

EP - 33

JO - Teaching of Psychology

JF - Teaching of Psychology

SN - 0098-6283

IS - 1

ER -