Private public-interest land use planning: land trusts in the upper Midwest

Pamela E Foti, H. M. Jacobs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Public-sector planning for private land has not, by itself, addressed the wide range of land use problems in the United States. In the last decade, local and regional land trusts have emerged to compliment and supplement those actions of public-sector planning directed toward land conservation and preservation. There are indications that the growth of these organizations will continue. The institutional aspects and conservation activities of these new players in the land use policy game are worth looking at in determining what opportunities exist for satisfying the goals of public and private interests. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJournal of Soil & Water Conservation
Pages317-319
Number of pages3
Volume44
Edition4
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

land use planning
public sector
land use
private land
land
public
planning
land conservation
policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Foti, P. E., & Jacobs, H. M. (1989). Private public-interest land use planning: land trusts in the upper Midwest. In Journal of Soil & Water Conservation (4 ed., Vol. 44, pp. 317-319)

Private public-interest land use planning : land trusts in the upper Midwest. / Foti, Pamela E; Jacobs, H. M.

Journal of Soil & Water Conservation. Vol. 44 4. ed. 1989. p. 317-319.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Foti, PE & Jacobs, HM 1989, Private public-interest land use planning: land trusts in the upper Midwest. in Journal of Soil & Water Conservation. 4 edn, vol. 44, pp. 317-319.
Foti PE, Jacobs HM. Private public-interest land use planning: land trusts in the upper Midwest. In Journal of Soil & Water Conservation. 4 ed. Vol. 44. 1989. p. 317-319
Foti, Pamela E ; Jacobs, H. M. / Private public-interest land use planning : land trusts in the upper Midwest. Journal of Soil & Water Conservation. Vol. 44 4. ed. 1989. pp. 317-319
@inbook{36667dea556c4e3dbed43b506a1ca444,
title = "Private public-interest land use planning: land trusts in the upper Midwest",
abstract = "Public-sector planning for private land has not, by itself, addressed the wide range of land use problems in the United States. In the last decade, local and regional land trusts have emerged to compliment and supplement those actions of public-sector planning directed toward land conservation and preservation. There are indications that the growth of these organizations will continue. The institutional aspects and conservation activities of these new players in the land use policy game are worth looking at in determining what opportunities exist for satisfying the goals of public and private interests. -Authors",
author = "Foti, {Pamela E} and Jacobs, {H. M.}",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "317--319",
booktitle = "Journal of Soil & Water Conservation",
edition = "4",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Private public-interest land use planning

T2 - land trusts in the upper Midwest

AU - Foti, Pamela E

AU - Jacobs, H. M.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - Public-sector planning for private land has not, by itself, addressed the wide range of land use problems in the United States. In the last decade, local and regional land trusts have emerged to compliment and supplement those actions of public-sector planning directed toward land conservation and preservation. There are indications that the growth of these organizations will continue. The institutional aspects and conservation activities of these new players in the land use policy game are worth looking at in determining what opportunities exist for satisfying the goals of public and private interests. -Authors

AB - Public-sector planning for private land has not, by itself, addressed the wide range of land use problems in the United States. In the last decade, local and regional land trusts have emerged to compliment and supplement those actions of public-sector planning directed toward land conservation and preservation. There are indications that the growth of these organizations will continue. The institutional aspects and conservation activities of these new players in the land use policy game are worth looking at in determining what opportunities exist for satisfying the goals of public and private interests. -Authors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024783621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024783621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:0024783621

VL - 44

SP - 317

EP - 319

BT - Journal of Soil & Water Conservation

ER -