Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

Mark E. Miller, Matthew A Bowker, Richard L. Reynolds, Harland L. Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar-Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0gm -2d -1 in unburned plots (n=8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2-555.3gm -2d -1 in burned plots that were not treated (n=5), and 21.0-44,010.7gm -2d -1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n=12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar-Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-44
Number of pages16
JournalAeolian Research
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

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wind erosion
sampler
soil property
perennial plant
annual plant
fetch
sediment
soil surface
land
erosion
sand
rehabilitation
soil

Keywords

  • Drylands
  • Dust
  • Land treatments
  • Spatial variability
  • Wildfire
  • Wind erosion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Geology

Cite this

Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA. / Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

In: Aeolian Research, Vol. 7, 12.2012, p. 29-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Mark E. ; Bowker, Matthew A ; Reynolds, Richard L. ; Goldstein, Harland L. / Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA. In: Aeolian Research. 2012 ; Vol. 7. pp. 29-44.
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