Polygenetic nature of a rhyolitic dome and implications for hazard assessment

Cerro Pizarro volcano, Mexico

G. Carrasco-Núñez, Nancy R Riggs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rhyolitic domes are commonly regarded as monogenetic volcanoes associated with single, brief eruptions, in contrast to andesitic or dacitic domes that usually show a complex evolution including alternating long periods of growth and explosive destruction. Rhyolitic domes are characterized by short-lived successions of pyroclastic and effusive activity associated with a series of discrete eruptive events that apparently last on the order of years to decades or perhaps up to centuries. Cerro Pizarro, a rhyolitic dome in the eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt, is a relatively small (~ 1.1 km3), isolated volcano that shows aspects of polygenetic volcanism including long-term repose periods (~ 50-80 ky) between eruptions, chemical variations over time, and a complex evolution of alternating explosive and effusive eruptions, including a cryptodome phase, a sector-collapse event and prolonged erosional processes. This eruptive behavior provides new insights into how rhyolite domes may evolve, in contrast to the traditional models of rhyolitic domes as short-lived, monogenetic systems. A protracted, complex evolution bears important implications for hazard assessment if reactivation of an apparently extinct rhyolitic dome must be seriously considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-315
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
Volume171
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2008

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Volcanoes
Mexico
Domes
hazard assessment
domes
volcanoes
hazards
dome
Hazards
volcano
volcanic eruptions
volcanic eruption
explosive
rhyolite
volcanic belt
bears
reactivation
destruction
volcanology
volcanism

Keywords

  • dome growth
  • Mexican Volcanic Belt
  • monogenetic volcanism
  • polygenetic volcanism
  • rhyolites
  • volcanic hazards

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Polygenetic nature of a rhyolitic dome and implications for hazard assessment : Cerro Pizarro volcano, Mexico. / Carrasco-Núñez, G.; Riggs, Nancy R.

In: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 171, No. 3-4, 20.04.2008, p. 307-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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