Plant hybrid zones as sinks for pests

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The more susceptible hybrid cottonwood Populus trees acted as aphid pest sinks supporting most of the Pemphigus betae population. At least 85-100% of the aphid population was concentrated on <3% of the host population, with the center of a pest's distribution being the hybrid zone of its host. The concentration of aphids on such a small segment of the host population suggested that susceptible plants not only acted as sinks in ecological time, but may also have prevented aphids from adapting to the more numerous resistant hosts in evolutionary time. -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1490-1493
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume244
Issue number4911
StatePublished - 1989

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Aphidoidea
pests
Pemphigus betae
at-risk population
Populus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Plant hybrid zones as sinks for pests. / Whitham, Thomas G.

In: Science, Vol. 244, No. 4911, 1989, p. 1490-1493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whitham, TG 1989, 'Plant hybrid zones as sinks for pests', Science, vol. 244, no. 4911, pp. 1490-1493.
Whitham, Thomas G. / Plant hybrid zones as sinks for pests. In: Science. 1989 ; Vol. 244, No. 4911. pp. 1490-1493.
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