Phylogeography of Bacillus anthracis in the country of Georgia shows evidence of population structuring and is dissimilar to other regional genotypes

Ekaterine Khmaladze, Dawn N. Birdsell, Amber A. Naumann, Christian B. Hochhalter, Meagan L. Seymour, Roxanne Nottingham, Stephen M. Beckstrom-Sternberg, James Beckstrom-Sternberg, Mikeljon P. Nikolich, Gvantsa Chanturia, Ekaterine Zhgenti, Mariam Zakalashvili, Lile Malania, Giorgi Babuadze, Nikoloz Tsertsvadze, Natalia Abazashvili, Merab Kekelidze, Shota Tsanava, Paata Imnadze, Holly H. GanzWayne M. Getz, Ofori Pearson, Pawel Gajer, Mark Eppinger, Jacques Ravel, David M. Wagner, Richard T. Okinaka, James M. Schupp, Paul Keim, Talima Pearson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sequence analyses and subtyping of Bacillus anthracis strains from Georgia reveal a single distinct lineage (Aust94) that is ecologically established. Phylogeographic analysis and comparisons to a global collection reveals a clade that is mostly restricted to Georgia. Within this clade, many groups are found around the country, however at least one subclade is only found in the eastern part. This pattern suggests that dispersal into and out of Georgia has been rare and despite historical dispersion within the country, for at least for one lineage, current spread is limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere102651
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 21 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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