Performance for the public concern

Understanding volunteer performance in a for-profit world

Jaime B. Henning, Ann H Huffman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Research in the area of volunteerism has typically concerned why individuals engage in this prosocial behavior. The current study examines volunteer performance and attempts to provide a framework to researchers and volunteer supervisors alike regarding variables important to this form of non-paid work. Dispositional, motivational, situational, and attitudinal variables known to be linked to performance in the paid work domain are used as a guide in beginning to explore the domain of volunteer performance. Additionally, the task-contextual performance distinction which has received much attention in research regarding paid work was used as model to help examine predictors of volunteer performance. Data were collected from 95 volunteers and their supervisors. Results showed that the variables of Conscientiousness and role overload were related to supervisors' ratings of volunteer task performance, while Conscientiousness, volunteer self-efficacy, job control, and role overload were related to ratings of volunteer contextual performance. Additionally, job satisfaction was found to mediate the relationships between job control and role overload with contextual performance. The implications and importance of these findings for volunteer organizations are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAcademy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006
StatePublished - 2006
Event66th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2006 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Aug 11 2006Aug 16 2006

Other

Other66th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2006
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period8/11/068/16/06

Fingerprint

Supervisory personnel
Personnel rating
Profitability
Job satisfaction
Volunteers

Keywords

  • Contextual Performance
  • Task Performance
  • Volunteerism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Henning, J. B., & Huffman, A. H. (2006). Performance for the public concern: Understanding volunteer performance in a for-profit world. In Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006

Performance for the public concern : Understanding volunteer performance in a for-profit world. / Henning, Jaime B.; Huffman, Ann H.

Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 2006.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Henning, JB & Huffman, AH 2006, Performance for the public concern: Understanding volunteer performance in a for-profit world. in Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 66th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2006, Atlanta, GA, United States, 8/11/06.
Henning JB, Huffman AH. Performance for the public concern: Understanding volunteer performance in a for-profit world. In Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 2006
Henning, Jaime B. ; Huffman, Ann H. / Performance for the public concern : Understanding volunteer performance in a for-profit world. Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 2006.
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