Perceived condom norms and HIV risks among social and sexual networks of young African American men who have sex with men

J. L. Peterson, R. Rothenberg, J. M. Kraft, C. Beeker, Robert T Trotter II

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The association between condom norms and unprotected sexual intercourse was examined within social and sexual networks of young African American men who have sex with men (MSM) in an HIV epicenter of the southern United States. We used a chain-link design to recruit 158 young African American men: 95 initial participants, 56 contacts of participants (alters) and 7 contacts of alters. Men in the high-risk group, compared with those in the no-risk group, perceived significantly lower approval concerning condom use in their social and sexual networks. Also, 100 participants could be connected to each other in 86 dyads of social and sexual networks. Within these dyads, men perceived that their friends and acquaintances approved for them to use condoms but that their friends and acquaintances did not use condoms themselves. Low HIV risk behavior appears associated with perceived social norms that support one's use of condoms, even when perceived norms do not support condom use by network members themselves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-127
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

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Condoms
Social Support
African Americans
HIV
dyad
contact
Social Norms
risk behavior
Coitus
Risk-Taking
Group
American

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

Perceived condom norms and HIV risks among social and sexual networks of young African American men who have sex with men. / Peterson, J. L.; Rothenberg, R.; Kraft, J. M.; Beeker, C.; Trotter II, Robert T.

In: Health Education Research, Vol. 24, No. 1, 02.2009, p. 119-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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