Patterns of cerebral glucose metabolism detected with positron emission tomography differ in multiple system atrophy and olivopontocerebellar atrophy

Sid Gilman, Robert A. Koeppe, Larry Junck, Karen J. Kluin, Mary Lohman, Roy T St Laurent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We used positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose to study local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (ICMRglc) in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy (sOPCA), and dominantly inherited olivopontocerebellar atrophy (dOPCA) in comparison with normal control subjects. In MSA, absolute ICMRglc was significantly decreased in the brainstem, cerebellum, putamen, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. In sOPCA, absolute ICMRglc was significantly decreased in the brainstem, cerebellum, putamen, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. In dOPCA, absolute ICMRglc was significantly decreased in the brainstem and cerebellum but not in the other structures. Examination of ICMRglc normalized to the cerebral cortex in comparison with normal controls revealed in MSA significant decreases in the brainstem, cerebellum, and putamen but, in both sOPCA and dOPCA, significant decreases only in the brainstem and cerebellum. The findings indicate that these three disorders all show a marked decrease of ICMRglc in the brainstem and cerebellum but differ in the degree of hypometabolism in forebrain and cerebral cortical structures. The results are consistent with the possibility that, in many cases, sOPCA will evolve into MSA. Moreover, positron emission tomography may provide helpful diagnostic information in these neurodegenerative diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-175
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Olivopontocerebellar Atrophies
Multiple System Atrophy
Positron-Emission Tomography
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
Glucose
Putamen
Cerebral Cortex
Thalamus
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Prosencephalon
Neurodegenerative Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Patterns of cerebral glucose metabolism detected with positron emission tomography differ in multiple system atrophy and olivopontocerebellar atrophy. / Gilman, Sid; Koeppe, Robert A.; Junck, Larry; Kluin, Karen J.; Lohman, Mary; St Laurent, Roy T.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 36, No. 2, 08.1994, p. 166-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gilman, Sid ; Koeppe, Robert A. ; Junck, Larry ; Kluin, Karen J. ; Lohman, Mary ; St Laurent, Roy T. / Patterns of cerebral glucose metabolism detected with positron emission tomography differ in multiple system atrophy and olivopontocerebellar atrophy. In: Annals of Neurology. 1994 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 166-175.
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