Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia

D. Robertshaw, R. Rawson, Pauline L Entin, F. Cole, D. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A panting animal, the sheep, develops hyperthermia (40-41°C) , hypocapnia (10-20 Torr), and lactacidosis (3-5 mM) during exercise at 50% of maximum oxygen consumption. Experiments were performed to determine if the lactacidosis was caused by impaired oxygen transfer caused by a hypocapnic increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. A flow probe (Transonic Systems, Inc., Ithaca, NY) was placed on the external iliac artery and blood samples were taken from the carotid artery and iliac vein. Net oxygen and lactate flux were calculated for one hindlimb during exercise. Oxygen delivery to the limb increased due to a rise in both hemoglobin concentration (7 to 11 g/dl) and blood flow (0.5 to 2.5 1/min). Oxygen extraction remained constant during exercise and the arteriovenous difference in lactate was zero. It was concluded that 1) there was no impediment to oxygen transfer associated with exercise-induced hypocapnia and that any increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin was offset by tissue hyperthermia and 2) the increase in plasma lactate concentration was due to relative hypoxia of tissues other than the muscles associated with exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypocapnia
exercise
Oxygen
oxygen
lactates
Lactic Acid
hemoglobin
Hemoglobins
fever
Fever
iliac artery
Blood
Iliac Vein
Tissue
carotid arteries
Iliac Artery
Hindlimb
limbs (animal)
Carotid Arteries
Oxygen Consumption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Robertshaw, D., Rawson, R., Entin, P. L., Cole, F., & Wilson, D. (1997). Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia. FASEB Journal, 11(3).

Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia. / Robertshaw, D.; Rawson, R.; Entin, Pauline L; Cole, F.; Wilson, D.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robertshaw, D, Rawson, R, Entin, PL, Cole, F & Wilson, D 1997, 'Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia', FASEB Journal, vol. 11, no. 3.
Robertshaw D, Rawson R, Entin PL, Cole F, Wilson D. Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia. FASEB Journal. 1997;11(3).
Robertshaw, D. ; Rawson, R. ; Entin, Pauline L ; Cole, F. ; Wilson, D. / Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia. In: FASEB Journal. 1997 ; Vol. 11, No. 3.
@article{369974ffe340435bb8ddc525f56ce1cb,
title = "Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia",
abstract = "A panting animal, the sheep, develops hyperthermia (40-41°C) , hypocapnia (10-20 Torr), and lactacidosis (3-5 mM) during exercise at 50{\%} of maximum oxygen consumption. Experiments were performed to determine if the lactacidosis was caused by impaired oxygen transfer caused by a hypocapnic increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. A flow probe (Transonic Systems, Inc., Ithaca, NY) was placed on the external iliac artery and blood samples were taken from the carotid artery and iliac vein. Net oxygen and lactate flux were calculated for one hindlimb during exercise. Oxygen delivery to the limb increased due to a rise in both hemoglobin concentration (7 to 11 g/dl) and blood flow (0.5 to 2.5 1/min). Oxygen extraction remained constant during exercise and the arteriovenous difference in lactate was zero. It was concluded that 1) there was no impediment to oxygen transfer associated with exercise-induced hypocapnia and that any increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin was offset by tissue hyperthermia and 2) the increase in plasma lactate concentration was due to relative hypoxia of tissues other than the muscles associated with exercise.",
author = "D. Robertshaw and R. Rawson and Entin, {Pauline L} and F. Cole and D. Wilson",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
journal = "FASEB Journal",
issn = "0892-6638",
publisher = "FASEB",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oxygen transfer during exercise-induced hypocapnia

AU - Robertshaw, D.

AU - Rawson, R.

AU - Entin, Pauline L

AU - Cole, F.

AU - Wilson, D.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - A panting animal, the sheep, develops hyperthermia (40-41°C) , hypocapnia (10-20 Torr), and lactacidosis (3-5 mM) during exercise at 50% of maximum oxygen consumption. Experiments were performed to determine if the lactacidosis was caused by impaired oxygen transfer caused by a hypocapnic increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. A flow probe (Transonic Systems, Inc., Ithaca, NY) was placed on the external iliac artery and blood samples were taken from the carotid artery and iliac vein. Net oxygen and lactate flux were calculated for one hindlimb during exercise. Oxygen delivery to the limb increased due to a rise in both hemoglobin concentration (7 to 11 g/dl) and blood flow (0.5 to 2.5 1/min). Oxygen extraction remained constant during exercise and the arteriovenous difference in lactate was zero. It was concluded that 1) there was no impediment to oxygen transfer associated with exercise-induced hypocapnia and that any increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin was offset by tissue hyperthermia and 2) the increase in plasma lactate concentration was due to relative hypoxia of tissues other than the muscles associated with exercise.

AB - A panting animal, the sheep, develops hyperthermia (40-41°C) , hypocapnia (10-20 Torr), and lactacidosis (3-5 mM) during exercise at 50% of maximum oxygen consumption. Experiments were performed to determine if the lactacidosis was caused by impaired oxygen transfer caused by a hypocapnic increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. A flow probe (Transonic Systems, Inc., Ithaca, NY) was placed on the external iliac artery and blood samples were taken from the carotid artery and iliac vein. Net oxygen and lactate flux were calculated for one hindlimb during exercise. Oxygen delivery to the limb increased due to a rise in both hemoglobin concentration (7 to 11 g/dl) and blood flow (0.5 to 2.5 1/min). Oxygen extraction remained constant during exercise and the arteriovenous difference in lactate was zero. It was concluded that 1) there was no impediment to oxygen transfer associated with exercise-induced hypocapnia and that any increase in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin was offset by tissue hyperthermia and 2) the increase in plasma lactate concentration was due to relative hypoxia of tissues other than the muscles associated with exercise.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33750100686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33750100686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33750100686

VL - 11

JO - FASEB Journal

JF - FASEB Journal

SN - 0892-6638

IS - 3

ER -