Operational Sex Ratio

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Operational Sex Ratio, or OSR, first defined as 'the ratio of receptive females to potential mating males at any one time,' was designed to measure the level of competition for mates in animal populations. The apparent utility of the OSR as a proxy for sexual selection intensity established it as a standard metric for animal mating system research. However, the relationships between OSR and actual measures of sexual selection have proven inconsistent. Thus, while useful for characterizing known experimental populations, estimates of OSR are not equivalent to those for sexual selection and are unlikely account for observed patterns of evolutionary change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages167-174
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780128004265
ISBN (Print)9780128000496
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 14 2016

Fingerprint

Sex Ratio
sexual selection
sex ratio
Animals
Proxy
Population
selection intensity
mating systems
animals
Research

Keywords

  • Competition for mates
  • Mating systems
  • Potential reproductive rate
  • Sex ratio
  • Sexual selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Shuster, S. M. (2016). Operational Sex Ratio. In Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology (pp. 167-174). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800049-6.00153-0

Operational Sex Ratio. / Shuster, Stephen M.

Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Elsevier Inc., 2016. p. 167-174.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Shuster, SM 2016, Operational Sex Ratio. in Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Elsevier Inc., pp. 167-174. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800049-6.00153-0
Shuster SM. Operational Sex Ratio. In Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Elsevier Inc. 2016. p. 167-174 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800049-6.00153-0
Shuster, Stephen M. / Operational Sex Ratio. Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Elsevier Inc., 2016. pp. 167-174
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