NEOSURVEY 1: INITIAL RESULTS from the WARM SPITZER EXPLORATION SCIENCE SURVEY of NEAR-EARTH OBJECT PROPERTIES

David E. Trilling, Michael Mommert, Joseph Hora, Steve Chesley, Joshua Emery, Giovanni Fazio, Alan Harris, Michael Mueller, Howard Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Near-Earth objects (NEOs) are small solar system bodies whose orbits bring them close to the Earth's orbit. We are carrying out a Warm Spitzer Cycle 11 Exploration Science program entitled NEOSurvey - a fast and efficient flux-limited survey of 597 known NEOs in which we derive a diameter and albedo for each target. The vast majority of our targets are too faint to be observed by NEOWISE, though a small sample has been or will be observed by both observatories, which allows for a cross-check of our mutual results. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties. We present here the first results from this new program: fluxes and derived diameters and albedos for 80 NEOs, together with a description of the overall program and approach, including several updates to our thermal model. The largest source of error in our diameter and albedo solutions, which derive from our single-band thermal emission measurements, is uncertainty in η, the beaming parameter used in our thermal modeling; for albedos, improvements in solar system absolute magnitudes would also help significantly. All data and derived diameters and albedos from this entire program are being posted on a publicly accessible Web page at nearearthobjects.nau.edu.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number172
JournalAstronomical Journal
Volume152
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2016

Keywords

  • catalogs
  • infrared: planetary systems
  • minor planets, asteroids: general
  • surveys

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'NEOSURVEY 1: INITIAL RESULTS from the WARM SPITZER EXPLORATION SCIENCE SURVEY of NEAR-EARTH OBJECT PROPERTIES'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this