Native-American languages

Jon A Reyhner, Louise Lockard, Judith W. Rosenthal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Indian languages are taught at both tribal and nontribal institutions of higher education. Some of the courses are taught on a regular basis and others by special arrangement or through independent study. Depending on the particular institution, the courses themselves may be offered through the departments of humanities, education, languages, linguistics, foreign languages, modern foreign languages, anthropology, or through an American Indian/Native American Studies program. Whereas some course offerings are at the undergraduate level, others are part of master’s and doctoral programs (Ballinger, 1993; IPOLA, 1998; Less Commonly Taught Languages at <http://carla.acad.umn.edu/lctl.LangIndex.html#B>).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Undergraduate Second Language Education
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages141-164
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781135676643
ISBN (Print)0805830235, 9780805830224
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Reyhner, J. A., Lockard, L., & Rosenthal, J. W. (2013). Native-American languages. In Handbook of Undergraduate Second Language Education (pp. 141-164). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781410605016-16