Native American kids

American Indian children's well-being indicators for the nation and two states

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

American Indian/Alaska Native well-being, survival-based data are rare. This study explores the question of whether or not it is possible to produce such well-being information using secondary data sources. The answer is yes, with some limitations. Hence, Native American data for 10 well-being indicators nationally and for New Mexico and South Dakota, using a model like Kids Count (Annie E. Casey Foundation: 2003a 2001 KIDS COUNT Data Book: State profiles of child well-being (Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD)) are reported; thereby reducing the gap in survival indicators for U.S. Indigenous children and youths. Comparisons between all children and American Indian children demonstrate that Native American children have comparatively worse well-being rates at the national level and in South Dakota, whereas New Mexico Native kids compare favorably to their non-Native peers. Policy recommendations conclude the paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-176
Number of pages28
JournalSocial Indicators Research
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

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child well-being
North American Indians
American Indian
Child Welfare
well-being
Mexico
Baltimore
Information Storage and Retrieval
Well-being
American Indians
Native Americans

Keywords

  • AI/AN child economic indicators
  • AI/AN child health indicators
  • AI/AN child well-being
  • AI/AN survival indicators
  • AI/ANhigh school dropouts
  • American Indian/Alaska Native children
  • American Indians risk factors
  • Families
  • Measures
  • NativeAmericans
  • Outcomes
  • Poverty indicator
  • Youths

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Native American kids : American Indian children's well-being indicators for the nation and two states. / Willeto, Angela.

In: Social Indicators Research, Vol. 83, No. 1, 08.2007, p. 149-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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