Multi-scale controls of historical forest-fire regimes

New insights from fire-scar networks

Donald A. Falk, Emily K. Heyerdahl, Peter M. Brown, Calvin Farris, Peter Z Fule, Donald McKenzie, Thomas W. Swetnam, Alan H. Taylor, Megan L. Van Horne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anticipating future forest-fire regimes under changing climate requires that scientists and natural resource managers understand the factors that control fire across space and time. Fire scars - proxy records of fires, formed in the growth rings of long-lived trees - provide an annually accurate window into past low-severity fire regimes. In western North America, networks of the fire-scar records spanning centuries to millennia now include hundreds to thousands of trees sampled across hundreds to many thousands of hectares. Development of these local and regional fire-scar networks has created a new data type for ecologists interested in landscape and climate regulation of ecosystem processes - which, for example, may help to explain why forest fires are widespread during certain years but not others. These data also offer crucial reference information on fire as a dynamic landscape process for use in ecosystem management, especially when managing for forest structure and resilience to climate change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)446-454
Number of pages9
JournalFrontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

fire scars
fire regime
forest fires
forest fire
climate change
ecosystem management
growth rings
ecologists
natural resources
space and time
managers
climate
ecosystems
natural resource
ecosystem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Falk, D. A., Heyerdahl, E. K., Brown, P. M., Farris, C., Fule, P. Z., McKenzie, D., ... Van Horne, M. L. (2011). Multi-scale controls of historical forest-fire regimes: New insights from fire-scar networks. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 9(8), 446-454. https://doi.org/10.1890/100052

Multi-scale controls of historical forest-fire regimes : New insights from fire-scar networks. / Falk, Donald A.; Heyerdahl, Emily K.; Brown, Peter M.; Farris, Calvin; Fule, Peter Z; McKenzie, Donald; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Taylor, Alan H.; Van Horne, Megan L.

In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Vol. 9, No. 8, 10.2011, p. 446-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Falk, DA, Heyerdahl, EK, Brown, PM, Farris, C, Fule, PZ, McKenzie, D, Swetnam, TW, Taylor, AH & Van Horne, ML 2011, 'Multi-scale controls of historical forest-fire regimes: New insights from fire-scar networks', Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, vol. 9, no. 8, pp. 446-454. https://doi.org/10.1890/100052
Falk, Donald A. ; Heyerdahl, Emily K. ; Brown, Peter M. ; Farris, Calvin ; Fule, Peter Z ; McKenzie, Donald ; Swetnam, Thomas W. ; Taylor, Alan H. ; Van Horne, Megan L. / Multi-scale controls of historical forest-fire regimes : New insights from fire-scar networks. In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 2011 ; Vol. 9, No. 8. pp. 446-454.
@article{3b32b371ba9a48a9ad10c9ba9f95e88c,
title = "Multi-scale controls of historical forest-fire regimes: New insights from fire-scar networks",
abstract = "Anticipating future forest-fire regimes under changing climate requires that scientists and natural resource managers understand the factors that control fire across space and time. Fire scars - proxy records of fires, formed in the growth rings of long-lived trees - provide an annually accurate window into past low-severity fire regimes. In western North America, networks of the fire-scar records spanning centuries to millennia now include hundreds to thousands of trees sampled across hundreds to many thousands of hectares. Development of these local and regional fire-scar networks has created a new data type for ecologists interested in landscape and climate regulation of ecosystem processes - which, for example, may help to explain why forest fires are widespread during certain years but not others. These data also offer crucial reference information on fire as a dynamic landscape process for use in ecosystem management, especially when managing for forest structure and resilience to climate change.",
author = "Falk, {Donald A.} and Heyerdahl, {Emily K.} and Brown, {Peter M.} and Calvin Farris and Fule, {Peter Z} and Donald McKenzie and Swetnam, {Thomas W.} and Taylor, {Alan H.} and {Van Horne}, {Megan L.}",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1890/100052",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "446--454",
journal = "Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment",
issn = "1540-9295",
publisher = "Ecological Society of America",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multi-scale controls of historical forest-fire regimes

T2 - New insights from fire-scar networks

AU - Falk, Donald A.

AU - Heyerdahl, Emily K.

AU - Brown, Peter M.

AU - Farris, Calvin

AU - Fule, Peter Z

AU - McKenzie, Donald

AU - Swetnam, Thomas W.

AU - Taylor, Alan H.

AU - Van Horne, Megan L.

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Anticipating future forest-fire regimes under changing climate requires that scientists and natural resource managers understand the factors that control fire across space and time. Fire scars - proxy records of fires, formed in the growth rings of long-lived trees - provide an annually accurate window into past low-severity fire regimes. In western North America, networks of the fire-scar records spanning centuries to millennia now include hundreds to thousands of trees sampled across hundreds to many thousands of hectares. Development of these local and regional fire-scar networks has created a new data type for ecologists interested in landscape and climate regulation of ecosystem processes - which, for example, may help to explain why forest fires are widespread during certain years but not others. These data also offer crucial reference information on fire as a dynamic landscape process for use in ecosystem management, especially when managing for forest structure and resilience to climate change.

AB - Anticipating future forest-fire regimes under changing climate requires that scientists and natural resource managers understand the factors that control fire across space and time. Fire scars - proxy records of fires, formed in the growth rings of long-lived trees - provide an annually accurate window into past low-severity fire regimes. In western North America, networks of the fire-scar records spanning centuries to millennia now include hundreds to thousands of trees sampled across hundreds to many thousands of hectares. Development of these local and regional fire-scar networks has created a new data type for ecologists interested in landscape and climate regulation of ecosystem processes - which, for example, may help to explain why forest fires are widespread during certain years but not others. These data also offer crucial reference information on fire as a dynamic landscape process for use in ecosystem management, especially when managing for forest structure and resilience to climate change.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053524117&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80053524117&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1890/100052

DO - 10.1890/100052

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 446

EP - 454

JO - Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

JF - Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

SN - 1540-9295

IS - 8

ER -