Methodological considerations in the study of work and occupations: The case of domestic workers in New York City

Sherrill L. Sellers, Colwick M. Wilson, Michelle Harris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

One of the best examples of the gendered division of labor-the degree to which some tasks in a society are assigned based on one's sex-is domestic labor. Viewed primarily as belonging to the female domain, domestic work has increasingly become associated with low-wage work for immigrant women from the developing world. Recent scholarship on domestic servants has explored some of the political and economic factors that influence this global trend (Hondagneu-Sotelo 2001; Palmer 1989). Hondagneu-Sotelo (2001), for instance, notes that Latinas are the group most likely to perform domestic work in California. She explains the phenomenon as a function of U.S. labor demands, increasing immigration restrictions on Latin American countries that favor service work and transformations in women's understanding of family relationships-most specifically, parenting. Increasingly, U.S. families are able to purchase from domestic servants the work that was once performed by wives and mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationResearching Black Communities
Subtitle of host publicationA Methodological Guide
PublisherUniversity of Michigan Press
Pages149-167
Number of pages19
Volume9780472026180
ISBN (Electronic)9780472026180
ISBN (Print)9780472117505
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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    Sellers, S. L., Wilson, C. M., & Harris, M. (2012). Methodological considerations in the study of work and occupations: The case of domestic workers in New York City. In Researching Black Communities: A Methodological Guide (Vol. 9780472026180, pp. 149-167). University of Michigan Press.