Managing knowledge in a changing scientific landscape: The impact of cyberinfrastructure

Susan A. Brown, Sherry Thatcher, Yan Dang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Motivating employees to share knowledge has been an ongoing challenge for organizations. In contrast, scientific and academic organizations have built reward systems around knowledge sharing. With the implementation of information and communication technologies and large-scale cyberinfrastructure initiatives, the nature of scientific knowledge sharing is evolving. Technology enables rapid dissemination of knowledge, yet institutions continue to build reward systems based on old models. The current paper describes research-in-progress to examine the skills, cultural shifts, and mindset changes necessary to capitalize on cyberinfrastructure for sharing scientific knowledge. Open-ended interview questions will be used to uncover the factors that are uniquely important in scientific knowledge sharing. While the research is focused on plant scientists who are involved with the iPlant collaborative, an NSF-funded project to build cyberinfrastructure to support research in the plant sciences, the results should be broadly applicable to large-scale technology-enabled science.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event43rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS-43 - Koloa, Kauai, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 5 2010Jan 8 2010

Other

Other43rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS-43
CountryUnited States
CityKoloa, Kauai, HI
Period1/5/101/8/10

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Personnel
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Brown, S. A., Thatcher, S., & Dang, Y. (2010). Managing knowledge in a changing scientific landscape: The impact of cyberinfrastructure. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences [5428464] https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2010.263

Managing knowledge in a changing scientific landscape : The impact of cyberinfrastructure. / Brown, Susan A.; Thatcher, Sherry; Dang, Yan.

Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. 2010. 5428464.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Brown, SA, Thatcher, S & Dang, Y 2010, Managing knowledge in a changing scientific landscape: The impact of cyberinfrastructure. in Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences., 5428464, 43rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS-43, Koloa, Kauai, HI, United States, 1/5/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2010.263
Brown SA, Thatcher S, Dang Y. Managing knowledge in a changing scientific landscape: The impact of cyberinfrastructure. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. 2010. 5428464 https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2010.263
Brown, Susan A. ; Thatcher, Sherry ; Dang, Yan. / Managing knowledge in a changing scientific landscape : The impact of cyberinfrastructure. Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. 2010.
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