Management of a large team-design and robotics-oriented sophomore design class

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Development and implementation of innovative, team-oriented, undergraduate design experiences can stimulate innovation in the engineering curriculum. However, combining team design with a hands-on technical realization experience can become unwieldy for an engineering program, due to the management of materials, students and instructors. Northern Arizona University has developed a management scheme for one of their large team design classes which allows for a controlled environment in which the class can be presented, yet flexible enough to incorporate ongoing changes each semester. The interdisciplinary sophomore design course - EGR 286 - is a relatively large class size for a single session, enrolling up to seventy students. It requires the coordination of over twenty student teams, each using separately assigned, university-owned, Lego® Mindstorm kits and accessories. The teams are eventually merged into a smaller number of larger teams by mid-semester. The assignments and anonymous student peer evaluations are managed through the adaptation of a distance-learning web-based system. The logistics of the team assignments, kit issue, student teaching assistants and computing/laptop management are addressed. The management scheme has resulted in an ability to allow several different instructors to teach the class with less difficulty. Another result is that the management structure allows for new projects and even new equipment to be implemented without changing the underlying teaching objectives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event38th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2008 - Saratoga Springs, NY, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2008Oct 25 2008

Other

Other38th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2008
CountryUnited States
CitySaratoga Springs, NY
Period10/22/0810/25/08

Fingerprint

Robotics
Students
management
Teaching
student
semester
instructor
Distance education
Accessories
engineering
Curricula
Logistics
Innovation
distance learning
assistant
experience
logistics
innovation
curriculum
university

Keywords

  • Class management
  • Engineering education
  • Legos
  • Mindstorm
  • Robotics education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Software
  • Education

Cite this

Management of a large team-design and robotics-oriented sophomore design class. / Tester, John.

Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2008. 4720581.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tester, J 2008, Management of a large team-design and robotics-oriented sophomore design class. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE., 4720581, 38th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2008, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States, 10/22/08. https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2008.4720581
Tester, John. / Management of a large team-design and robotics-oriented sophomore design class. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2008.
@inproceedings{62877f0205b146ea8e1604c23fdfb027,
title = "Management of a large team-design and robotics-oriented sophomore design class",
abstract = "Development and implementation of innovative, team-oriented, undergraduate design experiences can stimulate innovation in the engineering curriculum. However, combining team design with a hands-on technical realization experience can become unwieldy for an engineering program, due to the management of materials, students and instructors. Northern Arizona University has developed a management scheme for one of their large team design classes which allows for a controlled environment in which the class can be presented, yet flexible enough to incorporate ongoing changes each semester. The interdisciplinary sophomore design course - EGR 286 - is a relatively large class size for a single session, enrolling up to seventy students. It requires the coordination of over twenty student teams, each using separately assigned, university-owned, Lego{\circledR} Mindstorm kits and accessories. The teams are eventually merged into a smaller number of larger teams by mid-semester. The assignments and anonymous student peer evaluations are managed through the adaptation of a distance-learning web-based system. The logistics of the team assignments, kit issue, student teaching assistants and computing/laptop management are addressed. The management scheme has resulted in an ability to allow several different instructors to teach the class with less difficulty. Another result is that the management structure allows for new projects and even new equipment to be implemented without changing the underlying teaching objectives.",
keywords = "Class management, Engineering education, Legos, Mindstorm, Robotics education",
author = "John Tester",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1109/FIE.2008.4720581",
language = "English (US)",
booktitle = "Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Management of a large team-design and robotics-oriented sophomore design class

AU - Tester, John

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Development and implementation of innovative, team-oriented, undergraduate design experiences can stimulate innovation in the engineering curriculum. However, combining team design with a hands-on technical realization experience can become unwieldy for an engineering program, due to the management of materials, students and instructors. Northern Arizona University has developed a management scheme for one of their large team design classes which allows for a controlled environment in which the class can be presented, yet flexible enough to incorporate ongoing changes each semester. The interdisciplinary sophomore design course - EGR 286 - is a relatively large class size for a single session, enrolling up to seventy students. It requires the coordination of over twenty student teams, each using separately assigned, university-owned, Lego® Mindstorm kits and accessories. The teams are eventually merged into a smaller number of larger teams by mid-semester. The assignments and anonymous student peer evaluations are managed through the adaptation of a distance-learning web-based system. The logistics of the team assignments, kit issue, student teaching assistants and computing/laptop management are addressed. The management scheme has resulted in an ability to allow several different instructors to teach the class with less difficulty. Another result is that the management structure allows for new projects and even new equipment to be implemented without changing the underlying teaching objectives.

AB - Development and implementation of innovative, team-oriented, undergraduate design experiences can stimulate innovation in the engineering curriculum. However, combining team design with a hands-on technical realization experience can become unwieldy for an engineering program, due to the management of materials, students and instructors. Northern Arizona University has developed a management scheme for one of their large team design classes which allows for a controlled environment in which the class can be presented, yet flexible enough to incorporate ongoing changes each semester. The interdisciplinary sophomore design course - EGR 286 - is a relatively large class size for a single session, enrolling up to seventy students. It requires the coordination of over twenty student teams, each using separately assigned, university-owned, Lego® Mindstorm kits and accessories. The teams are eventually merged into a smaller number of larger teams by mid-semester. The assignments and anonymous student peer evaluations are managed through the adaptation of a distance-learning web-based system. The logistics of the team assignments, kit issue, student teaching assistants and computing/laptop management are addressed. The management scheme has resulted in an ability to allow several different instructors to teach the class with less difficulty. Another result is that the management structure allows for new projects and even new equipment to be implemented without changing the underlying teaching objectives.

KW - Class management

KW - Engineering education

KW - Legos

KW - Mindstorm

KW - Robotics education

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650759104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650759104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/FIE.2008.4720581

DO - 10.1109/FIE.2008.4720581

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE

ER -