Making good decisions: Having confidence in simulations in higher education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To achieve the desired learning outcomes it is critical that developers and users of simulations understand human decision-making. How participants will make decisions in the simulation is a function of both the participant's expertise and their interaction with the exercise design. It is an important pedagogical issue to know whether the design of the simulation reinforces and builds a participant's ability to respond in a normative reasoned fashion to a decision situation, or to experience the situation in its complexity and respond in a synthetic intuitive fashion. To comprehend the implications of these two viewpoints I present the debate between promoters of the normative views and the descriptive views on decision-making. By performing a critical analysis of these different perspectives, I offer insight on how the decision-making philosophy used in the design of simulations affects both the use of the simulation and the measurable learning outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-389
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Management Education
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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confidence
simulation
education
decision making
learning
expertise
Confidence
Simulation
ability
interaction
Decision making
experience
Learning outcomes

Keywords

  • Decision-making
  • Experiential learning
  • Learning outcomes
  • Simulations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Making good decisions : Having confidence in simulations in higher education. / Scherpereel, Christopher M.

In: International Journal of Management Education, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.11.2015, p. 381-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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