Maintaining and renewing native languages

Jon A Reyhner, Edward Tennant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reviews research on maintaining and renewing American Indian languages. A rationale is given for the importance of maintaining tribal languages in terms of Native students’ cross-cultural understanding. Then Joshua Fishman’s theoretical paradigm for reversing language shift is summarized and tribal and national language policies are reviewed. Early childhood, elementaiy, secondary, and tribal college native language efforts are described along with Navajo and Yup’ik examples of school-based native-language maintenance/renewal efforts. Based on the research of tribal native- language renewal efforts and current research on second language teaching, specific suggestions are given for maintaining and renewing native languages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-304
Number of pages26
JournalBilingual Research Journal
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

language
Native Language
language policy
American Indian
childhood
paradigm
Renewal
Teaching
school
student
Language Policy
Cross-cultural Understanding
Paradigm
Language Maintenance
Language
Second Language Teaching
Early childhood
National Language
Language Shift
American Indian Languages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Maintaining and renewing native languages. / Reyhner, Jon A; Tennant, Edward.

In: Bilingual Research Journal, Vol. 19, No. 2, 1995, p. 279-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reyhner, Jon A ; Tennant, Edward. / Maintaining and renewing native languages. In: Bilingual Research Journal. 1995 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 279-304.
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