Long-term and large-scale perspectives on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

Amy J. Symstad, F. Stuart Chapin, Diana H. Wall, Katherine L. Gross, Laura F Huenneke, Gary G. Mittelbach, Debra P C Peters, David Tilman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a growing body of literature from a variety of ecosystems is strong evidence that various components of biodiversity have significant impacts on ecosystem functioning. However, much of this evidence comes from short-term, small-scale experiments in which communities are synthesized from relatively small species pools and conditions are highly controlled. Extrapolation of the results of such experiments to longer time scales and larger spatial scales - those of whole ecosystems - is difficult because the experiments do not incorporate natural processes such as recruitment limitation and colonization of new species. We show how long-term study of planned and accidental changes in species richness and composition suggests that the effects of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning will vary over time and space. More important, we also highlight areas of uncertainty that need to be addressed through coordinated cross-scale and cross-site research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-98
Number of pages10
JournalBioScience
Volume53
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biodiversity
Ecosystem
biodiversity
ecosystems
ecosystem
species diversity
species pool
experiment
space and time
Uncertainty
uncertainty
colonization
species richness
new species
timescale
Research

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Community-ecosystem interactions
  • Ecosystem functioning
  • Spatial scale
  • Temporal scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Symstad, A. J., Chapin, F. S., Wall, D. H., Gross, K. L., Huenneke, L. F., Mittelbach, G. G., ... Tilman, D. (2003). Long-term and large-scale perspectives on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. BioScience, 53(1), 89-98.

Long-term and large-scale perspectives on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. / Symstad, Amy J.; Chapin, F. Stuart; Wall, Diana H.; Gross, Katherine L.; Huenneke, Laura F; Mittelbach, Gary G.; Peters, Debra P C; Tilman, David.

In: BioScience, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 89-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Symstad, AJ, Chapin, FS, Wall, DH, Gross, KL, Huenneke, LF, Mittelbach, GG, Peters, DPC & Tilman, D 2003, 'Long-term and large-scale perspectives on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning', BioScience, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 89-98.
Symstad AJ, Chapin FS, Wall DH, Gross KL, Huenneke LF, Mittelbach GG et al. Long-term and large-scale perspectives on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. BioScience. 2003 Jan 1;53(1):89-98.
Symstad, Amy J. ; Chapin, F. Stuart ; Wall, Diana H. ; Gross, Katherine L. ; Huenneke, Laura F ; Mittelbach, Gary G. ; Peters, Debra P C ; Tilman, David. / Long-term and large-scale perspectives on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In: BioScience. 2003 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 89-98.
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