Living in opposition: How women in the United States cope in spite of mistrust of federal leadership during the pandemic of Covid-19

Lisa J. Hardy, Adi Mana, Leah Mundell, Sharón Benheim, Kayla Torres Morales, Shifra Sagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

International research collaborators conducted research investigating sociocultural responses to the Covid-19 pandemic. Our mixed methods research design includes surveys and interviews conducted between March and September of 2020 including 249 of 506 survey responses and 18 of 50 in-depth, exploratory, semi-structured interviews with self-defined politically left-leaning women in the United States. We employ a sequential design to analyze statistical and qualitative data. Despite international data suggesting that trust in federal governments reduces anxiety, women who did not trust and actively opposed the Trump administration reported lower levels of anxiety than expected. Results indicate reliance on and development of new forms of connection that seem to mitigate symptomatic anxieties when living in opposition. Women living in opposition to the leadership of the federal government use and develop resources to help them cope. Research on coping strategies and mental health and anxiety during crisis can inform recommendations for ways to support and strengthen sense of coherence during tumultuous times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Covid-19
  • anxiety
  • health equity
  • mixed methods
  • pandemic
  • politics
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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