Isotopic studies of sources of uranium in sediments of the Ashtabula River, Ohio, U.S.A.

Michael E Ketterer, William C. Wetzel, Ricky R. Layman, Gerald Matisoff, Everett C. Bonniwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Uranium contamination of anthropogenic origin has been identified in unconsolidated sediments of a 1.5 km portion of the Ashtabula River near its confluence with Lake Erie. Uranium concentrations as high as 188 μg/g dry sediment are present. A small tributary of the Ashtabula River, Fields Brook, is the apparent point of origin of the uranium in the Ashtabula River sediments. 137Cs dating of a sediment core indicates that the U contamination occurred during the post-1964 time frame. The horizons of elevated U concentration also exhibit > 10x elevations in Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta, and W. 238U/235U isotopic ratios indicate that the uranium is largely but not exclusively of natural composition. Distinct horizons of slightly 235U-depleted (238U/235U > 137.88) and slightly 235U-enriched (238U/235U < 137.88) uranium are also present. 210Pb activities and 232Th/230Th isotopic measurements indicate that a significant portion of the uranium contains 238U daughters in approximate secular equilibrium. It is inferred that at least two distinct sources of anthropogenic U contamination exist: (A) discharges from the processing of enriched and depleted U metal by a DOE contractor facility and (B) U-bearing wastes from the production of TiO2 from ilmenite and associated minerals. These isotopic methodologies are potentially useful in settings where releases of nonnatural 238U/235U composition materials and/or 'naturally occurring radioactive material' (NORM) have taken place.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)966-972
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2000

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Uranium
uranium
Sediments
Rivers
river
sediment
Contamination
Bearings (structural)
Ilmenite
Radioactive materials
confluence
ilmenite
Chemical analysis
isotopic ratio
Contractors
fluvial deposit
Minerals
sediment core
Lakes
tributary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Isotopic studies of sources of uranium in sediments of the Ashtabula River, Ohio, U.S.A. / Ketterer, Michael E; Wetzel, William C.; Layman, Ricky R.; Matisoff, Gerald; Bonniwell, Everett C.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 34, No. 6, 15.03.2000, p. 966-972.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ketterer, Michael E ; Wetzel, William C. ; Layman, Ricky R. ; Matisoff, Gerald ; Bonniwell, Everett C. / Isotopic studies of sources of uranium in sediments of the Ashtabula River, Ohio, U.S.A. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2000 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 966-972.
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